Patterns of alcohol consumption in young Australian women: socio-demographic factors, health-related behaviours and physical health

Jonas, H. A., Dobson, A. J. and Brown, W. J. (2000) Patterns of alcohol consumption in young Australian women: socio-demographic factors, health-related behaviours and physical health. Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 24 2: 185-191. doi:10.1111/j.1467-842X.2000.tb00140.x


Author Jonas, H. A.
Dobson, A. J.
Brown, W. J.
Title Patterns of alcohol consumption in young Australian women: socio-demographic factors, health-related behaviours and physical health
Journal name Australian And New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
Publication date 2000-01-01
Year available 2000
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1467-842X.2000.tb00140.x
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 185
End page 191
Total pages 7
Place of publication CURTIN
Publisher PUBLIC HEALTH ASSOC AUSTRALIA INC
Language eng
Subject 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Abstract Objective: To determine which sociodemographic factors. health-related behaviours and physical health conditions are associated with non-drinking, binge drinking and hazardous/harmful drinking in young Australian women. Methods: Cross-sectional data were obtained from the baseline survey of 14,762 young women (aged 18-23 years) enrolled in the Women's Health Australia study in 1996. Associations between a range of drinking patterns and sociodemographic factors, health-related behaviours and health conditions were examined. Results: Half the women were 'low intake' drinkers, a third 'rarely drank' and 9% were non-drinkers; however, 70% reported binge drinking with one-quarter of the binge drinkers doing so at least weekly. Nondrinkers were more likely than drinkers to be married, pregnant, non-smokers, born in non-English speaking countries, to live in the Northern Territory, and to have lower levels of education, employment, and private health insurance. Low intake/binge weekly' drinkers (12%) and 'hazardous/ harmful' drinkers (5%) were more likely than 'low risk' drinkers to be unmarried; to live in shared accommodation, alone or with their parents; to live in rural or remote areas; to have ever had any sexually transmitted infection; to be current smokers or ex-smokers and to have used unhealthy weight-control practices. Conclusions: The results confirm findings from other countries about the importance of social conditions as determinants of alcohol consumption by young women. Implications: Health promotion to reduce young women's alcohol consumption needs to be carefully targeted to take account of their demographies, living environments and beliefs.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Problem Drinking
Epidemiology
Adulthood
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 21:42:39 EST