Socially Desirable Responding: Enhancement and Denial in 20 Countries

He, Jia, van de Vijver, Fons J. R., Dominguez Espinosa, Alejandra, Abubakar, Amina, Dimitrova, Radosveta, Adams, Byron G., Aydinli, Arzu, Atitsogbe, Kokou, Alonso-Arbiol, Itziar, Bobowik, Magdalena, Fischer, Ronald, Jordanov, Venzislav, Mastrotheodoros, Stefanos, Neto, Felix, Ponizovsky, Yael J., Reb, Jochen, Sim, Samantha, Sovet, Laurent, Stefenel, Delia, Suryani, Angela O., Tair, Ergyul and Villieux, Arnaud (2015) Socially Desirable Responding: Enhancement and Denial in 20 Countries. Cross-Cultural Research, 49 3: 227-249. doi:10.1177/1069397114552781


Author He, Jia
van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
Dominguez Espinosa, Alejandra
Abubakar, Amina
Dimitrova, Radosveta
Adams, Byron G.
Aydinli, Arzu
Atitsogbe, Kokou
Alonso-Arbiol, Itziar
Bobowik, Magdalena
Fischer, Ronald
Jordanov, Venzislav
Mastrotheodoros, Stefanos
Neto, Felix
Ponizovsky, Yael J.
Reb, Jochen
Sim, Samantha
Sovet, Laurent
Stefenel, Delia
Suryani, Angela O.
Tair, Ergyul
Villieux, Arnaud
Title Socially Desirable Responding: Enhancement and Denial in 20 Countries
Journal name Cross-Cultural Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1069-3971
1552-3578
Publication date 2015-07-06
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1069397114552781
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 49
Issue 3
Start page 227
End page 249
Total pages 23
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher SAGE Publications
Language eng
Subject 3314 Anthropology
1201 Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
3201 Psychology (miscellaneous)
Abstract This article investigated the dimensionality, measurement invariance, and cross-cultural variations of social desirability. A total of 3,471 university students from 20 countries completed an adapted version of the Marlowe–Crowne scale. A two-dimensional structure was revealed in the pooled sample, distinguishing enhancement (endorsement of positive self-description) and denial (rejection of negative self-description). The factor structure was supported in most countries; medium-sized item bias was found in two denial items. In a multilevel analysis, we found that (a) there was more cross-cultural variation in denial than enhancement; (b) females tended to score higher on enhancement whereas males tended to score higher on denial; (c) the Human Development Index, an indicator of country socioeconomic development, was the best (negative) predictor of denial; and (d) both enhancement and denial seemed to be associated with country-level values and personality pertinent to “fitting in.” We conclude that social desirability has a positive and a negative impression management dimension that are meaningfully associated with country-level characteristics, and we argue that social desirability is better interpreted as culturally regulated response amplification.
Formatted abstract
This article investigated the dimensionality, measurement invariance, and cross-cultural variations of social desirability. A total of 3,471 university students from 20 countries completed an adapted version of the Marlowe–Crowne scale. A two-dimensional structure was revealed in the pooled sample, distinguishing enhancement (endorsement of positive self-description) and denial (rejection of negative self-description). The factor structure was supported in most countries; medium-sized item bias was found in two denial items. In a multilevel analysis, we found that (a) there was more cross-cultural variation in denial than enhancement; (b) females tended to score higher on enhancement whereas males tended to score higher on denial; (c) the Human Development Index, an indicator of country socioeconomic development, was the best (negative) predictor of denial; and (d) both enhancement and denial seemed to be associated with country-level values and personality pertinent to “fitting in.” We conclude that social desirability has a positive and a negative impression management dimension that are meaningfully associated with country-level characteristics, and we argue that social desirability is better interpreted as culturally regulated response amplification.
Keyword Social desirability
Cultures
Values
Personality
Multilevel analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 8 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 9 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 14 Jun 2015, 10:35:03 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service