Can early intervention policies improve well-being? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial

Doyle, Orla, Delaney, Liam, O'Farrelly, Christine, Fitzpatrick, Nick and Dal, Michael (2015). Can early intervention policies improve well-being? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial. LCC Working Paper Series 2015-10, Institute for Social Science Research, The University of Queensland.

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Author Doyle, Orla
Delaney, Liam
O'Farrelly, Christine
Fitzpatrick, Nick
Dal, Michael
Title Can early intervention policies improve well-being? Evidence from a randomized controlled trial
School, Department or Centre Institute for Social Science Research
Institution The University of Queensland
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Series LCC Working Paper Series
Report Number 2015-10
Publication date 2015-05
Total pages 39
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study uses an experimental design to estimate the effect of a targeted policy intervention on global and experienced measures of maternal well-being. Participants are randomly assigned during pregnancy to an intensive parenting program or a control group. Well-being is assessed after approximately four years of program exposure. Global well-being is captured using measures of life satisfaction and parenting stress. Experienced well-being is captured using episodic reports of affect derived from the Day Reconstruction Method and a measure of mood yesterday. The intervention has no impact on global or negative measures, yet some individual treatment effects are observed on experienced measures of positive affect and mood yesterday, particularly during times spent without the target child. This may reflect a greater value being placed on non-parenting time, given the additional investment in parenting promoted by the intervention. These results suggest that early policy interventions may produce meaningful improvements in experienced well-being.
Keyword Well-being
Randomized controlled trial
Early intervention
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 03 Jun 2015, 16:22:39 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of Institute for Social Science Research