Evolution of the genetic covariance between male and female components of mate recognition: An experimental test

Blows, M. W. (1999) Evolution of the genetic covariance between male and female components of mate recognition: An experimental test. Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B - Biological Sciences, 266 1434: 2169-2174. doi:10.1098/rspb.1999.0904


Author Blows, M. W.
Title Evolution of the genetic covariance between male and female components of mate recognition: An experimental test
Journal name Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B - Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8452
Publication date 1999-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1098/rspb.1999.0904
Volume 266
Issue 1434
Start page 2169
End page 2174
Total pages 6
Place of publication London
Publisher Royal Society of London
Language eng
Subject C1
Abstract The evolution of a positive genetic correlation between male and female components of mate recognition systems will result as a consequence of assortative mating and, in particular, is central to a number of theories of sexual selection. Although the existence of such genetic correlations has been investigated in a number of taxa, it has yet to be shown that such correlations evolve and whether they may evolve as rapidly as suggested by sexual selection models. In this study, I used a hybridization experiment to disrupt natural mate recognition systems and then observed the subsequent evolutionary dynamics of the genetic correlation between male and female components for 56 generations in hybrids between Drosophila serrata and Drosophila birchii. The genetic correlation between male and female components evolved from 0.388 at generation 5 to 1.017 at generation 37 and then declined to -0.040 after a further 19 generations. These results indicated that the genetic basis of the mate recognition system in the hybrid populations evolved rapidly. The initial rapid increase in the genetic correlation was consistent with the classic assumption that male and female components will coevolve under sexual selection. The subsequent decline in genetic correlation may be attributable to the fixation of major genes or, alternatively, may be a result of a cyclic evolutionary change in mate recognition.
Keyword Biology
Genetic Correlation
Mate Recognition
Hybridization
Sexual Selection
Drosophila
Preferences
Speciation
Populations
Characters
Traits
Q-Index Code C1

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 21:27:54 EST