‘Trying to get a grip’: language competence and self-reported satisfaction with social relationships three decades post-childhood traumatic brain injury

Atay, Christina, Ryan, Sarah J. and Lewis, Fiona M. (2015) ‘Trying to get a grip’: language competence and self-reported satisfaction with social relationships three decades post-childhood traumatic brain injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, 31 5: E30-E40. doi:10.1097/HTR.0000000000000182


Author Atay, Christina
Ryan, Sarah J.
Lewis, Fiona M.
Title ‘Trying to get a grip’: language competence and self-reported satisfaction with social relationships three decades post-childhood traumatic brain injury
Journal name Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1550-509X
0885-9701
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/HTR.0000000000000182
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 31
Issue 5
Start page E30
End page E40
Total pages 11
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: (1) To investigate outcomes in language competence and self-reported satisfaction with social relationships in long-term survivors of childhood traumatic brain injury (TBI); and (2) to establish whether language competence contributes to self-reported satisfaction with social relationships decades after sustaining childhood TBI.

Participants: Twelve females and 8 males aged 30 to 55 (mean = 39.80, standard deviation = 7.54) years who sustained a TBI during childhood and were on average 31 years postinjury (standard deviation = 9.69). An additional 20 participants matched for age, sex, handedness, years of education, and socioeconomic status constituted a control group.

Main Measures: Test of Language Competence—Expanded Edition and the Quality of Life in Brain Injury questionnaire.

Results: Individuals with a history of childhood TBI performed significantly poorer than their non-injured peers on 2 (Ambiguous Sentences and Oral Expression: Recreating Sentences) out of the 4 Test of Language Competence—Expanded Edition subtests used and on the Quality of Life in Brain Injury subscale assessing satisfaction with social relationships. In the TBI group, scores obtained on the Ambiguous Sentences subtest were found to be a significant predictor of satisfaction with social relationships, explaining 25% of the variance observed.

Conclusions: The implication of high-level language skills to self-reported satisfaction with social relationships many decades post-childhood TBI suggests that ongoing monitoring of emerging language skills and support throughout the school years and into adulthood may be warranted if adult survivors of childhood TBI are to experience satisfying social relationships
Keyword Traumatic brain injury
Adolescent
Childhood
Long-term
Language
Social
Relationships
QOLIBRI
TLC-E
High-level
Ambiguous
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Fri, 24 Apr 2015, 17:53:26 EST by Dr Fiona Lewis on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences