Radiological interpretation of images displayed on tablet computers: a systematic review

Caffery, L. J., Armfield, N. R. and Smith, A. C. (2015) Radiological interpretation of images displayed on tablet computers: a systematic review. British Journal of Radiology, 88 1050: 1-13. doi:10.1259/bjr.20150191

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Author Caffery, L. J.
Armfield, N. R.
Smith, A. C.
Title Radiological interpretation of images displayed on tablet computers: a systematic review
Journal name British Journal of Radiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-1285
1748-880X
Publication date 2015-06-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1259/bjr.20150191
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 88
Issue 1050
Start page 1
End page 13
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher British Institute of Radiology
Language eng
Abstract Objective: To review the published evidence and to determine if radiological diagnostic accuracy is compromised when images are displayed on a tablet computer and thereby inform practice on using tablet computers for radiological interpretation by on-call radiologists.
Formatted abstract
Objective:
To review the published evidence and to determine if radiological diagnostic accuracy is compromised when images are displayed on a tablet computer and thereby inform practice on using tablet computers for radiological interpretation by on-call radiologists.

Methods:
We searched the PubMed and EMBASE databases for studies on the diagnostic accuracy or diagnostic reliability of images interpreted on tablet computers. Studies were screened for inclusion based on pre-determined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Studies were assessed for quality and risk of bias using Quality Appraisal of Diagnostic Reliability Studies or the revised Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. Treatment of studies was reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA).

Results:
11 studies met the inclusion criteria. 10 of these studies tested the Apple iPad® (Apple, Cupertino, CA). The included studies reported high sensitivity (84–98%), specificity (74–100%) and accuracy rates (98–100%) for radiological diagnosis. There was no statistically significant difference in accuracy between a tablet computer and a digital imaging and communication in medicine-calibrated control display. There was a near complete consensus from authors on the non-inferiority of diagnostic accuracy of images displayed on a tablet computer. All of the included studies were judged to be at risk of bias.

Conclusion:
Our findings suggest that the diagnostic accuracy of radiological interpretation is not compromised by using a tablet computer. This result is only relevant to the Apple iPad and to the modalities of CT, MRI and plain radiography.

Advances in knowledge:
The iPad may be appropriate for an on-call radiologist to use for radiological interpretation.
Keyword Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
Centre for Online Health Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 21 Apr 2015, 23:03:27 EST by Burke, Eliza on behalf of Centre for On-Line Health