The development, factor structure and psychometric properties of driving self-regulation scales for older adults: has self-regulation evolved in the last 15 years?

Wong, Ides Y., Smith, Simon S. and Sullivan, Karen A. (2015) The development, factor structure and psychometric properties of driving self-regulation scales for older adults: has self-regulation evolved in the last 15 years?. Accident Analysis and Prevention, 80 1-6. doi:10.1016/j.aap.2015.03.035


Author Wong, Ides Y.
Smith, Simon S.
Sullivan, Karen A.
Title The development, factor structure and psychometric properties of driving self-regulation scales for older adults: has self-regulation evolved in the last 15 years?
Journal name Accident Analysis and Prevention   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0001-4575
1879-2057
Publication date 2015-07-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.aap.2015.03.035
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 80
Start page 1
End page 6
Total pages 6
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 3307 Human Factors and Ergonomics
2213 Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
2739 Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
3308 Law
Abstract The term driving self-regulation is typically used to describe the practice of drivers who avoid driving in situations that they regard as unsafe because of perceived physical impairment. Older adults report using this strategy to improve safety while retaining mobility. Self-regulation is typically assessed using the driving avoidance items from the driving habits questionnaire (DHQ) and the driver mobility questionnaire (DMQ-A). However, the psychometric properties of these measures are not well understood. Using data from 277 older drivers, exploratory factor analysis was used to test the homogeneity of three driving self-regulation scales: the DHQ DMQ-A, and an extended DMQ-A. Good internal consistency for each of the scales was identified (all alpha s >=.9). A one factor solution was identified for two of the measures (DHQ DMQ-A) and a two factor solution accounting for over 70% of the score variance was identified for the third measure. The two factors assessed situations that may be avoided while driving because of the "external" (e.g., weather-related) or "internal" (e.g., passenger-related) driving environments, respectively. The findings suggest that the interpretation of an overall summated scale score, or single-item interpretations, may not be appropriate. Instead, driving self-regulation may be a multifaceted construct comprised of distinct dimensions that have not been identified previously but can be reliably measured. These data have implications for our understanding of driving self-regulation by older adults and the way in which this behavior is measured. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
The term driving self-regulation is typically used to describe the practice of drivers who avoid driving in situations that they regard as unsafe because of perceived physical impairment. Older adults report using this strategy to improve safety while retaining mobility. Self-regulation is typically assessed using the driving avoidance items from the driving habits questionnaire (DHQ) and the driver mobility questionnaire (DMQ-A). However, the psychometric properties of these measures are not well understood. Using data from 277 older drivers, exploratory factor analysis was used to test the homogeneity of three driving self-regulation scales: the DHQ, DMQ-A, and an extended DMQ-A. Good internal consistency for each of the scales was identified (all αs ≥ .9). A one factor solution was identified for two of the measures (DHQ, DMQ-A) and a two factor solution accounting for over 70% of the score variance was identified for the third measure. The two factors assessed situations that may be avoided while driving because of the “external” (e.g., weather-related) or “internal” (e.g., passenger-related) driving environments, respectively. The findings suggest that the interpretation of an overall summated scale score, or single-item interpretations, may not be appropriate. Instead, driving self-regulation may be a multifaceted construct comprised of distinct dimensions that have not been identified previously but can be reliably measured. These data have implications for our understanding of driving self-regulation by older adults and the way in which this behavior is measured.
Keyword Driving
Older adults
Self-regulation scale
Factor analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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