"It's very hard to change yourself": an exploration of overactivity in people with chronic pain using an interpretative phenomenological analysis

Andrews, Nicole Emma, Strong, Jenny, Meredith, Pamela Joy, Gordon, Kellie and Bagraith, Karl Singh (2015) "It's very hard to change yourself": an exploration of overactivity in people with chronic pain using an interpretative phenomenological analysis. Pain, 156 7: 1215-1231. doi:10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000161

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Andrews, Nicole Emma
Strong, Jenny
Meredith, Pamela Joy
Gordon, Kellie
Bagraith, Karl Singh
Title "It's very hard to change yourself": an exploration of overactivity in people with chronic pain using an interpretative phenomenological analysis
Journal name Pain   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3959
1872-6623
Publication date 2015-07-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000161
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 156
Issue 7
Start page 1215
End page 1231
Total pages 17
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Abstract Overactivity (activity engagement that significantly exacerbates pain) is a common term in the chronic pain literature. Overactivity is accepted clinically as a behaviour that adversely affects an individual's daily functioning and is the target of one of the most widely endorsed pain management strategies among health professionals (ie, activity pacing). Little research, however, has investigated links between overactivity behaviour and indicators of patient functioning, and activity pacing has not been evaluated as a stand-alone treatment specifically for individuals with chronic pain who are habitually overactive. Two studies, using qualitative research designs and interpretative phenomenological analyses, were conducted to provide insight into (1) why certain individuals develop habitual overactivity patterns in response to pain, (2) the impact of overactivity on daily functioning, and (3) the value of activity pacing as a treatment strategy for this population. Findings suggest that overactivity behaviour is complex, influenced by multiple factors, and negatively impacts on multiple quality-of-life domains. Some participants who were followed up 3 to 6 months after a pain management program were able to learn pacing strategies and enact behaviour change with health professional support; however, the majority reported difficulties changing their behaviour after treatment. It is suggested that provision of pacing education, alone, to chronic pain patients who engage in overactivity behaviour may not be effective in eliciting behavioural change. Key factors that participants believed to contribute to the development and maintenance of their overactive behaviour in this study should be considered in future clinical approaches and empirical investigations.
Formatted abstract
Overactivity (activity engagement that significantly exacerbates pain) is a common term in the chronic pain literature. Overactivity is accepted clinically as a behaviour that adversely affects an individual’s daily functioning and is the target of one of the most widely endorsed pain management strategies among health professionals (ie, activity pacing). Little research, however, has investigated links between overactivity behaviour and indicators of patient functioning, and activity pacing has not been evaluated as a standalone treatment specifically for individuals with chronic pain who are habitually overactive. Two studies, using qualitative research designs and interpretative phenomenological analyses, were conducted to provide insight into (1) why certain individuals develop habitual overactivity patterns in response to pain, (2) the impact of overactivity on daily functioning, and (3) the value of activity pacing as a treatment strategy for this population. Findings suggest that overactivity behaviour is complex, influenced by multiple factors, and negatively impacts on multiple quality-of-life domains. Some participants who were followed up 3 to 6 months after a pain management program were able to learn pacing strategies and enact behaviour change with health professional support; however, the majority reported difficulties changing their behaviour after treatment. It is suggested that provision of pacing education, alone, to chronic pain patients who engage in overactivity behaviour may not be effective in eliciting behavioural change. Key factors that participants believed to contribute to the development and maintenance of their overactive behaviour in this study should be considered in future clinical approaches and empirical investigations.
Keyword Chronic pain
Overactivity
Pacing
Activity pattern
Pain management programs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 13 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 13 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 08 Apr 2015, 00:26:45 EST by Professor Jenny Strong on behalf of Occupational Therapy