Estimation of the hip joint centre in human motion analysis: A systematic review

Kainz, Hans, Carty, Christopher P, Modenese, Luca, Boyd, Roslyn N and Lloyd, David G (2015) Estimation of the hip joint centre in human motion analysis: A systematic review. Clinical Biomechanics, 30 4: 319-329. doi:10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2015.02.005


Author Kainz, Hans
Carty, Christopher P
Modenese, Luca
Boyd, Roslyn N
Lloyd, David G
Title Estimation of the hip joint centre in human motion analysis: A systematic review
Journal name Clinical Biomechanics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1879-1271
0268-0033
Publication date 2015-05-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.clinbiomech.2015.02.005
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 4
Start page 319
End page 329
Total pages 11
Place of publication Kidlington, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press (Elsevier Science)
Language eng
Abstract Background: Inaccuracies in locating the three-dimensional position of the hip joint centre affect the calculated hip and knee kinematics, force-and moment-generating capacity of muscles and hip joint mechanics, which can lead to incorrect interpretations and recommendations in gait analysis. Several functional and predictive methods have been developed to estimate the hip joint centre location, and the International Society of Biomechanics recommends a functional approach for use with participants that have adequate range of motion at the hip, and predictive methods in those with insufficient range of motion. The purpose of the current systematic review was to substantiate the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations. This included identifying the most accurate functional and predictive methods, and defining 'adequate' range of motion.
Formatted abstract
Background

Inaccuracies in locating the three-dimensional position of the hip joint centre affect the calculated hip and knee kinematics, force- and moment-generating capacity of muscles and hip joint mechanics, which can lead to incorrect interpretations and recommendations in gait analysis. Several functional and predictive methods have been developed to estimate the hip joint centre location, and the International Society of Biomechanics recommends a functional approach for use with participants that have adequate range of motion at the hip, and predictive methods in those with insufficient range of motion. The purpose of the current systematic review was to substantiate the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations. This included identifying the most accurate functional and predictive methods, and defining ‘adequate’ range of motion.

Methods


A systematic search with broad search terms was performed including five databases.

Findings

The systematic search yielded to 801 articles, of which 34 papers were included. Eleven different predictive and 13 different functional methods were identified. The results showed that the geometric sphere fit method and Harrington equations are the most accurate functional and predictive approaches respectively that have been evaluated in vivo.

Interpretation

In regard to the International Society of Biomechanics recommendations, the geometric sphere fit method should be used in people with sufficient active hip range of motion and the Harrington equations should be used in patients without sufficient hip range of motion. Multi-plane movement trials with at least 60° of flexion–extension and 30° of ab-adduction range of motion are suggested when using functional methods.
Keyword Accuracy
Hip joint centre
Gait analysis
Functional method
Predictive method
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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