Improved surgical margin definition by Narrow Band Imaging for resection of oral squamous cell carcinoma: a prospective gene expression profiling study

Farah, Camile S., Dalley, Andrew J., Nguyen, Phan, Batstone, Martin, Kordbacheh, Farzaneh, Perry-Keene, Joanna and Fielding, David (2015) Improved surgical margin definition by Narrow Band Imaging for resection of oral squamous cell carcinoma: a prospective gene expression profiling study. Head and Neck, 38 6: 832-839. doi:10.1002/hed.23989


Author Farah, Camile S.
Dalley, Andrew J.
Nguyen, Phan
Batstone, Martin
Kordbacheh, Farzaneh
Perry-Keene, Joanna
Fielding, David
Title Improved surgical margin definition by Narrow Band Imaging for resection of oral squamous cell carcinoma: a prospective gene expression profiling study
Journal name Head and Neck   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1097-0347
1043-3074
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2016
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/hed.23989
Open Access Status
Volume 38
Issue 6
Start page 832
End page 839
Total pages 8
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Subject 2733 Otorhinolaryngology
Abstract Background Incomplete primary tumor excision contributes to localized postsurgical recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The purpose of this study was to provide molecular evidence that surgical margin definition using narrow band imaging (NBI) resulted in more complete OSCC excision than conventional white light (WL) panendoscopy. Methods Molecular divergence among tumor, WL, and NBI-defined surgical margins was compared in 18 patients through microarray analysis (GeneChip U133-plus-2.0). Results The numbers of differentially expressed genes (NBI = 4387; WL = 3266; vs tumor) signified that NBI placed margins into less involved tissue than WL examination. Principal component analysis segregated tumor, WL, and NBI tissues appropriately based solely on mRNA profiles, and unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified 4 patients (22%) who benefited directly from NBI surgical margin definition. Gene ontology enrichment indicated increasing cell phenotypic diversity: tumor
Formatted abstract
Background: Incomplete primary tumour excision contributes to localised post-surgical recurrence of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The objective was to provide molecular evidence that surgical margin definition using Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) resulted in more complete OSCC excision than conventional white light (WL) panendoscopy.

Methods: Molecular divergence between tumour, WL and NBI defined surgical margins was compared in 18 patients through microarray analysis (GeneChip®U133-plus-2.0).

Results: The numbers of differentially expressed genes (NBI: 4387; WL: 3266; versus tumour) signified that NBI placed margins into less involved tissue than WL examination. Principal Component Analysis segregated tumour, WL and NBI tissues appropriately based solely on mRNA profiles, and unsupervised hierarchical clustering identified four patients (22%) who benefited directly from NBI surgical margin definition. Gene ontology enrichment indicated increasing cell phenotypic diversity: Tumour<WL<NBI.

Conclusions: Resection to NBI defined margins will leave less dysplastic and malignant residual tissue and thereby increase ablative surgery success rates.
Keyword Surgical margins
Oral squamous cell carcinoma
Narrow band imaging
Prevention of second cancers
Microarray analysis
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 01 Apr 2015, 21:37:43 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research