Heritability of fractional anisotropy in human white matter: A comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI data

Kochunov, Peter, Jahanshad, Neda, Marcus, Daniel, Winkler, Anderson, Sprooten, Emma, Nichols, Thomas E, Wright, Susan N, Hong, L. Elliot, Patel, Binish, Behrens, Timothy, Jbabdi, Saad, Andersson, Jesper, Lenglet, Christophe, Yacoub, Essa, Moeller, Steen, Auerbach, Eddie, Ugurbil, Kamil, Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N, Brouwer, Rachel M, Landman, Bennett, Lemaitre, Herve, den Braber, Anouk, Zwiers, Marcel P, Ritchie, Stuart, van Hulzen, Kimm, Almasy, Laura, Curran, Joanne, deZubicaray, Greig I, Duggirala, Ravi, Fox, Peter, Martin, Nicholas G, McMahon, Katie L, Mitchell, Braxton, Olvera, Rene L, Peterson, Charles, Starr, John, Sussmann, Jessika, Wardlaw, Joanna, Wright, Margie, Boomsma, Dorret I, Kahn, Rene, de Geus, Eco J. C, Williamson, Douglas E, Hariri, Ahmad, van 't Ent, Dennis, Bastin, Mark E, McIntosh, Andrew, Deary, Ian J, Hulshoff pol, Hilleke E, Blangero, John, Thompson, Paul M, Glahn, David C and Van Essen, David C (2015) Heritability of fractional anisotropy in human white matter: A comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI data. NeuroImage, 111 300-311. doi:10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.02.050


Author Kochunov, Peter
Jahanshad, Neda
Marcus, Daniel
Winkler, Anderson
Sprooten, Emma
Nichols, Thomas E
Wright, Susan N
Hong, L. Elliot
Patel, Binish
Behrens, Timothy
Jbabdi, Saad
Andersson, Jesper
Lenglet, Christophe
Yacoub, Essa
Moeller, Steen
Auerbach, Eddie
Ugurbil, Kamil
Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N
Brouwer, Rachel M
Landman, Bennett
Lemaitre, Herve
den Braber, Anouk
Zwiers, Marcel P
Ritchie, Stuart
van Hulzen, Kimm
Almasy, Laura
Curran, Joanne
deZubicaray, Greig I
Duggirala, Ravi
Fox, Peter
Martin, Nicholas G
McMahon, Katie L
Mitchell, Braxton
Olvera, Rene L
Peterson, Charles
Starr, John
Sussmann, Jessika
Wardlaw, Joanna
Wright, Margie
Boomsma, Dorret I
Kahn, Rene
de Geus, Eco J. C
Williamson, Douglas E
Hariri, Ahmad
van 't Ent, Dennis
Bastin, Mark E
McIntosh, Andrew
Deary, Ian J
Hulshoff pol, Hilleke E
Blangero, John
Thompson, Paul M
Glahn, David C
Van Essen, David C
Title Heritability of fractional anisotropy in human white matter: A comparison of Human Connectome Project and ENIGMA-DTI data
Journal name NeuroImage   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-9572
1053-8119
Publication date 2015-05-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2015.02.050
Open Access Status PMC
Volume 111
Start page 300
End page 311
Total pages 12
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Subject 2808 Neurology
2805 Cognitive Neuroscience
Abstract The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) reconstruction in 481 HCP subjects (194/287 M/F) consisting of 57/60 pairs of mono- and dizygotic twins, and 246 siblings. FA measurements were derived using (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) ENIGMA DTI protocols and heritability estimates were calculated using the SOLAR-Eclipse imaging genetic analysis package. We compared heritability estimates derived from HCP data to those publicly available through the ENIGMA-DTI consortium, which were pooled together from five-family based studies across the US, Europe, and Australia. FA measurements from the HCP cohort for eleven major white matter tracts were highly heritable (h=0.53-0.90, p<10), and were significantly correlated with the joint-analytical estimates from the ENIGMA cohort on the tract and voxel-wise levels. The similarity in regional heritability suggests that the additive genetic contribution to white matter microstructure is consistent across populations and imaging acquisition parameters. It also suggests that the overarching genetic influence provides an opportunity to define a common genetic search space for future gene-discovery studies. Uniquely, the measurements of additive genetic contribution performed in this study can be repeated using online genetic analysis tools provided by the HCP ConnectomeDB web application.
Formatted abstract
The degree to which genetic factors influence brain connectivity is beginning to be understood. Large-scale efforts are underway to map the profile of genetic effects in various brain regions. The NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) is providing data valuable for analyzing the degree of genetic influence underlying brain connectivity revealed by state-of-the-art neuroimaging methods. We calculated the heritability of the fractional anisotropy (FA) measure derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) reconstruction in 481 HCP subjects (194/287 M/F) consisting of 57/60 pairs of mono- and dizygotic twins, and 246 siblings. FA measurements were derived using (Enhancing NeuroImaging Genetics through Meta-Analysis) ENIGMA DTI protocols and heritability estimates were calculated using the SOLAR-Eclipse imaging genetic analysis package. We compared heritability estimates derived from HCP data to those publicly available through the ENIGMA-DTI consortium, which were pooled together from five-family based studies across the US, Europe, and Australia. FA measurements from the HCP cohort for eleven major white matter tracts were highly heritable (h2 = 0.53–0.90, p < 10− 5), and were significantly correlated with the joint-analytical estimates from the ENIGMA cohort on the tract and voxel-wise levels. The similarity in regional heritability suggests that the additive genetic contribution to white matter microstructure is consistent across populations and imaging acquisition parameters. It also suggests that the overarching genetic influence provides an opportunity to define a common genetic search space for future gene-discovery studies. Uniquely, the measurements of additive genetic contribution performed in this study can be repeated using online genetic analysis tools provided by the HCP ConnectomeDB web application.
Keyword Spatial Normalization
Alzheimers-Disease
Bipolar Disorder
Diffusion Mri
Brain
Integrity
Registration
Genetics
Statistics
Resolution
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID EB007813
EB008281
EB008432
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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