Cognitive enhancement, lifestyle choice or misuse of prescription drugs? Ethics blind spots in current debates

Racine, Eric and Forlini, Cynthia (2010) Cognitive enhancement, lifestyle choice or misuse of prescription drugs? Ethics blind spots in current debates. Neuroethics, 3 1: 1-4. doi:10.1007/s12152-008-9023-7


Author Racine, Eric
Forlini, Cynthia
Title Cognitive enhancement, lifestyle choice or misuse of prescription drugs? Ethics blind spots in current debates
Journal name Neuroethics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1874-5490
1874-5504
Publication date 2010-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12152-008-9023-7
Volume 3
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 4
Total pages 4
Place of publication Dordrecht, The Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2010
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The prospects of enhancing cognitive or motor functions using neuroscience in otherwise healthy individuals has attracted considerable attention and interest in neuroethics (Farah et al., Nature Reviews Neuroscience 5:421–425, 2004; Glannon Journal of Medical Ethics 32:74–78, 2006). The use of stimulants is one of the areas which has propelled the discussion on the potential for neuroscience to yield cognition-enhancing products. However, we have found in our review of the literature that the paradigms used to discuss the non-medical use of stimulant drugs prescribed for attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) vary considerably. In this brief communication, we identify three common paradigms—prescription drug abuse, cognitive enhancement, and lifestyle use of pharmaceuticals—and briefly highlight how divergences between paradigms create important “ethics blind spots”.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 31 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 30 Mar 2015, 20:10:23 EST by Cynthia Forlini on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research