Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles.

Powell, Prudence O., Sullivan, Mitchell A., Sheehy, Joshua J., Schulz, Benjamin L., Warren, Frederick J. W. and Gilbert, Robert G. (2015) Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles.. PLoS One, 10 3: e0121337-e0121337. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0121337


Author Powell, Prudence O.
Sullivan, Mitchell A.
Sheehy, Joshua J.
Schulz, Benjamin L.
Warren, Frederick J. W.
Gilbert, Robert G.
Title Acid Hydrolysis and Molecular Density of Phytoglycogen and Liver Glycogen Helps Understand the Bonding in Glycogen α (Composite) Particles.
Journal name PLoS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2015-03-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0121337
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 10
Issue 3
Start page e0121337
End page e0121337
Total pages 20
Place of publication San Francisco, CA United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Subject 2700 Medicine
1300 Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology
1100 Agricultural and Biological Sciences
Abstract Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite a particles from smaller beta particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct a and beta components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen beta particles resulting in the formation of large a particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between beta into a particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where a-particle structure is impaired.
Formatted abstract
Phytoglycogen (from certain mutant plants) and animal glycogen are highly branched glucose polymers with similarities in structural features and molecular size range. Both appear to form composite α particles from smaller ß particles. The molecular size distribution of liver glycogen is bimodal, with distinct α and ß components, while that of phytoglycogen is monomodal. This study aims to enhance our understanding of the nature of the link between liver-glycogen ß particles resulting in the formation of large α particles. It examines the time evolution of the size distribution of these molecules during acid hydrolysis, and the size dependence of the molecular density of both glucans. The monomodal distribution of phytoglycogen decreases uniformly in time with hydrolysis, while with glycogen, the large particles degrade significantly more quickly. The size dependence of the molecular density shows qualitatively different shapes for these two types of molecules. The data, combined with a quantitative model for the evolution of the distribution during degradation, suggest that the bonding between ß into α particles is different between phytoglycogen and liver glycogen, with the formation of a glycosidic linkage for phytoglycogen and a covalent or strong non-covalent linkage, most probably involving a protein, for glycogen as most likely. This finding is of importance for diabetes, where α-particle structure is impaired.
Keyword Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP130102461
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
Official 2016 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2015, 20:17:24 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of Centre for Nutrition and Food Sciences