Trait resilience fosters adaptive coping when control opportunities are high: implications for the motivating potential of active work

Parker, Stacey L., Jimmieson, Nerina L., Walsh, Alexandra J. and Loakes, Jennifer L. (2014) Trait resilience fosters adaptive coping when control opportunities are high: implications for the motivating potential of active work. Journal of Business and Psychology, 30 3: 583-604. doi:10.1007/s10869-014-9383-4


Author Parker, Stacey L.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Walsh, Alexandra J.
Loakes, Jennifer L.
Title Trait resilience fosters adaptive coping when control opportunities are high: implications for the motivating potential of active work
Journal name Journal of Business and Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0889-3268
1573-353X
Publication date 2014-10-11
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10869-014-9383-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 30
Issue 3
Start page 583
End page 604
Total pages 22
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York
Language eng
Subject 1403 Business and International Management
1400 Business, Management and Accounting
3202 Applied Psychology
3200 Psychology
Abstract We examine the interaction between trait resilience and control in predicting coping and performance. Drawing on a person-environment fit perspective, we hypothesized resilient individuals would cope and perform better in demanding work situations when control was high. In contrast, those low in resilience would cope and perform better when control was low. Recognizing the relationship between trait resilience and performance also could be indirect, adaptive coping was examined as a mediating mechanism through which high control enables resilient individuals to demonstrate better performance.
Formatted abstract
Purpose

We examine the interaction between trait resilience and control in predicting coping and performance. Drawing on a person–environment fit perspective, we hypothesized resilient individuals would cope and perform better in demanding work situations when control was high. In contrast, those low in resilience would cope and perform better when control was low. Recognizing the relationship between trait resilience and performance also could be indirect, adaptive coping was examined as a mediating mechanism through which high control enables resilient individuals to demonstrate better performance.

Methodology

In Study 1 (N = 78) and Study 2 (N = 94), participants completed a demanding inbox task in which trait resilience was measured and high and low control was manipulated. Study 3 involved surveying 368 employees on their trait resilience, control, and demand at work (at Time 1), and coping and performance 1 month later at Time 2.

Findings

For more resilient individuals, high control facilitated problem-focused coping (Study 1, 2, and 3), which was indirectly associated with higher subjective performance (Study 1), mastery (Study 2), adaptive, and proficient performance (Study 3). For more resilient individuals, high control also facilitated positive reappraisal (Study 2 and 3), which was indirectly associated with higher adaptive and proficient performance (Study 3).

Implications

Individuals higher in resilience benefit from high control because it enables adaptive coping.
Keyword Trait resilience
Control
Coping strategies
Mastery
Performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 27 Mar 2015, 01:30:01 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology