Using epidemiological survey data to examine factors influencing participation in parent-training programmes

Morawska, Alina, Ramadewi, Mikha Dyah and Sanders, Matthew R. (2014) Using epidemiological survey data to examine factors influencing participation in parent-training programmes. Journal of Early Childhood Research, 12 3: 264-278. doi:10.1177/1476718X14536952


Author Morawska, Alina
Ramadewi, Mikha Dyah
Sanders, Matthew R.
Title Using epidemiological survey data to examine factors influencing participation in parent-training programmes
Journal name Journal of Early Childhood Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1476-718X
1741-2927
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1476718X14536952
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 12
Issue 3
Start page 264
End page 278
Total pages 15
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Subject 3306 Health (social science)
3304 Education
3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
Abstract Evidence-based parent-training programmes aim to reduce child behaviour problems; however, the effects of these programmes are often limited by poor participation rates. This study proposes a model of parent, child and family factors related to parental participation in parenting interventions. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to survey parents of 4- to 7-year-old children (N = 2999). Logistic regression analyses showed that several parent and child variables were predictive of participation. In contrast, family variables, and other parent and child variables were not. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression showed that parental help-seeking behaviour and parenting style were the only significant predictors of participation. Mediation analyses found that help-seeking behaviour was a mediator between perceived child behaviour problems and participation, help-seeking behaviour was a mediator between parental depression and participation, perceived child behaviour problems was a partial mediator between parenting style and participation and parental depression was a partial mediator between perceived child behaviour problems and participation. Overall, the model was partially supported. The results extend previous research into parental participation in parenting programmes.
Formatted abstract
Evidence-based parent-training programmes aim to reduce child behaviour problems; however, the effects of these programmes are often limited by poor participation rates. This study proposes a model of parent, child and family factors related to parental participation in parenting interventions. A computer-assisted telephone interview was used to survey parents of 4- to 7-year-old children (N = 2999). Logistic regression analyses showed that several parent and child variables were predictive of participation. In contrast, family variables, and other parent and child variables were not. Hierarchical multiple logistic regression showed that parental help-seeking behaviour and parenting style were the only significant predictors of participation. Mediation analyses found that help-seeking behaviour was a mediator between perceived child behaviour problems and participation, help-seeking behaviour was a mediator between parental depression and participation, perceived child behaviour problems was a partial mediator between parenting style and participation and parental depression was a partial mediator between perceived child behaviour problems and participation. Overall, the model was partially supported. The results extend previous research into parental participation in parenting programmes.
Keyword Child behaviour
Engagement
Parent training
Participation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2015, 21:19:15 EST by Mrs Alison Pike on behalf of School of Psychology