Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions

Tulloch, Vivitskaia, Tulloch, Ayesha, Visconti, Piero, Halpern, Benjamin S., Watson, James E. M., Evans, Megan C., Auerbach, Nancy A., Barnes, Megan, Beger, Maria, Chadès, Iadine, Giakoumi, Sylvaine, McDonald-Madden, Eve, Murray, Nicholas J., Ringma, Jeremy and Possingham, Hugh P. (2015) Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 13 2: 91-99. doi:10.1890/140022

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Author Tulloch, Vivitskaia
Tulloch, Ayesha
Visconti, Piero
Halpern, Benjamin S.
Watson, James E. M.
Evans, Megan C.
Auerbach, Nancy A.
Barnes, Megan
Beger, Maria
Chadès, Iadine
Giakoumi, Sylvaine
McDonald-Madden, Eve
Murray, Nicholas J.
Ringma, Jeremy
Possingham, Hugh P.
Title Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions
Journal name Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1540-9295
1540-9309
ISBN 978-0-643092-26-6
Publication date 2015-03-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1890/140022
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 13
Issue 2
Start page 91
End page 99
Total pages 9
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher Ecological Society of America
Language eng
Abstract Spatial representations of threatening processes – “threat maps” – can identify where biodiversity is at risk, and are often used to identify priority locations for conservation. In doing so, decision makers are prone to making errors, either by assuming that the level of threat dictates spatial priorities for action or by relying primarily on the location of mapped threats to choose possible actions. We show that threat mapping can be a useful tool when incorporated within a transparent and repeatable structured decision-making (SDM) process. SDM ensures transparent and defendable conservation decisions by linking objectives to biodiversity outcomes, and by considering constraints, consequences of actions, and uncertainty. If used to make conservation decisions, threat maps are best developed with an understanding of how species respond to actions that mitigate threats. This approach will ensure that conservation actions are prioritized where they are most cost-effective or have the greatest impact, rather than where threat levels are highest.
Keyword Ecology
Environmental Sciences
Environmental Sciences & Ecology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Copyright by the Ecological Society of America. Vivitskaia JD Tulloch, Ayesha IT Tulloch, Piero Visconti, Benjamin S Halpern, James EM Watson, Megan C Evans, Nancy A Auerbach, Megan Barnes, Maria Beger, Iadine Chadès, Sylvaine Giakoumi, Eve McDonald-Madden, Nicholas J Murray, Jeremy Ringma, and Hugh P Possingham 2015. Why do we map threats? Linking threat mapping with actions to make better conservation decisions. Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 13: 91–99.

 
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Created: Thu, 26 Mar 2015, 00:14:15 EST by Genna Apted on behalf of School of Geography, Planning & Env Management