Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study

He, Jia and van de Vijver, Fons J. R. (2015) Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study. Personality and Individual Differences, 81 129-134. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2014.09.009


Author He, Jia
van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
Title Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study
Journal name Personality and Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2015-07-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2014.09.009
Open Access Status
Volume 81
Start page 129
End page 134
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Language eng
Abstract We investigated how response styles, personality traits, and values can be taken as manifestations of self-presentation styles in self-reports, and how self-presentation affects other self-report measures over time. Data on values and character traits at three time points across five years collected among a national representative sample in the Netherlands were utilized. A general response style factor consisting of extreme, socially desirable, and midpoint responding, a general factor of personality from the International Personality Inventory, and a general value factor from the Rokeach Value Survey were extracted, all of which showed scalar invariance across time. A latent self-presentation factor underlying the three general factors at each time point, and its stability and changes across time points was modeled. All three general factors loaded positively on the self-presentation factor. The latent mean of the self-presentation factor became smaller over time, yet effects of its impact on the relationships among various psychological variables remained small and stable over time. We conclude that survey respondents show a similar self-presentation style across domains and over time. Score corrections to deal with response styles are not recommended.
Keyword Self-presentation
Personality
Values
Response styles
General factor
Score correction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 29 Sep 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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