Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study

He, Jia and van de Vijver, Fons J. R. (2015) Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study. Personality and Individual Differences, 81 129-134. doi:10.1016/j.paid.2014.09.009


Author He, Jia
van de Vijver, Fons J. R.
Title Self-presentation styles in self-reports: linking the general factors of response styles, personality traits, and values in a longitudinal study
Journal name Personality and Individual Differences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0191-8869
1873-3549
Publication date 2015-07-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.paid.2014.09.009
Volume 81
Start page 129
End page 134
Total pages 6
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon Press
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract We investigated how response styles, personality traits, and values can be taken as manifestations of self-presentation styles in self-reports, and how self-presentation affects other self-report measures over time. Data on values and character traits at three time points across five years collected among a national representative sample in the Netherlands were utilized. A general response style factor consisting of extreme, socially desirable, and midpoint responding, a general factor of personality from the International Personality Inventory, and a general value factor from the Rokeach Value Survey were extracted, all of which showed scalar invariance across time. A latent self-presentation factor underlying the three general factors at each time point, and its stability and changes across time points was modeled. All three general factors loaded positively on the self-presentation factor. The latent mean of the self-presentation factor became smaller over time, yet effects of its impact on the relationships among various psychological variables remained small and stable over time. We conclude that survey respondents show a similar self-presentation style across domains and over time. Score corrections to deal with response styles are not recommended.
Keyword Self-presentation
Personality
Values
Response styles
General factor
Score correction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 29 Sep 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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