Insufficiently active Australian college students: Perceived personal, social, and environmental influences

Leslie, E., Owen, N., Salmon, J., Bauman, A., Sallis, J. F. and Lo, S. K. (1999) Insufficiently active Australian college students: Perceived personal, social, and environmental influences. Preventive Medicine, 28 1: 20-27. doi:10.1006/pmed.1998.0375


Author Leslie, E.
Owen, N.
Salmon, J.
Bauman, A.
Sallis, J. F.
Lo, S. K.
Title Insufficiently active Australian college students: Perceived personal, social, and environmental influences
Journal name Preventive Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0091-7435
1096-0260
Publication date 1999-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1006/pmed.1998.0375
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 28
Issue 1
Start page 20
End page 27
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York ; London
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 1117 Public Health and Health Services
Abstract Background. A sustainable pattern of participation in physical activity is important in the maintenance of health and prevention of disease, College students are in transition from an active youth to a more sedentary adult behavior pattern. Methods. We assessed self-reported physical activity and other characteristics in a sample of 2,729 male and female students (median age was 20 years) recruited from representative courses and year levels at four Australian College campuses. They were categorized as sufficiently or insufficiently active, using estimates of energy expenditure (kcal/week) derived from self-reported physical activity, Personal factors (self-efficacy, job status, enjoyment), social factors (social support from family/friends), and environmental factors (awareness of facilities, gym membership) were also assessed. Results. Forty-seven percent of females and 32% of males were insufficiently active. For females, the significant independent predictors of being insufficiently active were lower social support from family and friends, lower enjoyment of activity, and not working. For males, predictors were lower social support from family and friends, lower enjoyment of activity, and being older. Conclusions. Factors associated with physical activity participation (particularly social support from family and friends) can inform physical activity strategies directed at young adults in the college setting. (C) 1999 American Health Foundation and Academic Press.
Keyword Public, Environmental & Occupational Health
Medicine, General & Internal
Exercise
Physical Health Promotion
Health Behavior
Social Support
Time Physical-activity
Descriptive Epidemiology
Community Sample
Public-health
Young-adults
Exercise
Participation
Determinants
Behaviors
Barriers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Excellence in Research Australia (ERA) - Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 20:51:54 EST