Driven by distraction: investigating the effects of anxiety on driving performance using the Attentional Control Theory

Wong, Ides Y., Mahar, D. and Titchener, K. (2014) Driven by distraction: investigating the effects of anxiety on driving performance using the Attentional Control Theory. Journal of Risk Research, 18 10: 1293-1306. doi:10.1080/13669877.2014.919516


Author Wong, Ides Y.
Mahar, D.
Titchener, K.
Title Driven by distraction: investigating the effects of anxiety on driving performance using the Attentional Control Theory
Journal name Journal of Risk Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1366-9877
1466-4461
Publication date 2014-06-18
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13669877.2014.919516
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 18
Issue 10
Start page 1293
End page 1306
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
This study investigates the effects of trait anxiety on self-reported driving behaviours through its negative impacts on Central Executive functions. Following a self-report study that found trait anxiety to be significantly related to driving behaviours, the present study extended the predictions of Eysenck and Calvo’s Attentional Control Theory, proposing that anxiety affects driving behaviours, in particular driving lapses, through its impact across the Central Executive.  Seventy-five Australian drivers participated in the study, completing the Parametric Go/No-Go and n-back tasks, as well as the State-Trait Anxiety
Inventory and the Driving Behaviour Questionnaire. While both trait anxiety and processing efficiency of the Central Executive was found to significantly predict driving lapses, trait anxiety remained a strong predictor of driving lapses after
processing efficiency was controlled for. It is concluded that while processing efficiency of the central Executive is a key determinant of driving lapses, another Central Executive function that is closer to the driving lapses in the trait anxiety
– driving lapses relationship may be needed. Suggestions regarding how to improve future trait anxiety – driving behaviours research are discussed.
Keyword Anxiety
Driving
Central Executive functions
Attentional Control Theory
Processing efficiency
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Public Health Publications
Non HERDC
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 06 Mar 2015, 18:35:09 EST by Ides Wong on behalf of School of Public Health