Toward the multilevel older person’s transportation and road safety model: a new perspective on the role of demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors

Wong, Ides Y., Smith, Simon S., Sullivan, Karen A. and Allan, Alicia C. (2014) Toward the multilevel older person’s transportation and road safety model: a new perspective on the role of demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors. Journals of Gerontology. Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, 71 1: 71-86. doi:10.1093/geronb/gbu099


Author Wong, Ides Y.
Smith, Simon S.
Sullivan, Karen A.
Allan, Alicia C.
Title Toward the multilevel older person’s transportation and road safety model: a new perspective on the role of demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors
Journal name Journals of Gerontology. Series B: Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1758-5368
1079-5014
Publication date 2014-09-03
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/geronb/gbu099
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 71
Issue 1
Start page 71
End page 86
Total pages 13
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Abstract Self-regulation refers to the practice of using self-imposed restrictions to protect oneself from situations that are, or are perceived to be, unsafe. Within the driving context, self-regulation refers the compensatory practices that some older adults adopt to restrict their driving to situations in which they feel safe. However, the way in which demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors, and the interactions between these factors, influence older adults' driving self-regulation is not well understood. Improving this understanding could lead to new ways of considering the mobility concerns faced by older drivers.
Formatted abstract
Objectives. Self-regulation refers to the practice of using self-imposed restrictions to protect oneself from situations that are, or are perceived to be, unsafe. Within the driving context, self-regulation refers the compensatory practices that some older adults adopt to restrict their driving to situations in which they feel safe. However, the way in which demographic, functional, and psychosocial factors, and the interactions between these factors, influence older adults’ driving self-regulation is not well understood. Improving this understanding could lead to new ways of considering the mobility concerns faced by older drivers.

Method. A systematic review of the current literature was conducted to explore this issue. Twenty-nine empirical studies investigating the factors associated with older adults’ self-regulatory driving behaviors were examined.

Results. The review findings were used to construct the Multilevel Older Persons Transportation and Road Safety (MOTRS) model. The MOTRS model proposes that individual and environmental factors such as age, gender, and the availability of alternative transportation predict older adults’ practice of driving-related self-regulation. However, these variables influence self-regulation through psychosocial variables such as driving confidence, affective attitude, and instrumental attitude toward driving.

Discussions. The MOTRS model extends previous attempts to model older adults’ driving by focusing on a novel target, driving self-regulation, and by including a wider range of predictors identified on the basis of the systematic literature review. This focus enables consideration of broader mobility issues and may inform new strategies to support the mobility of older adults.
Keyword Driving
Driving self-regulation
Mobility
Older adults
Safety
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 3 September 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 06 Mar 2015, 18:31:51 EST by Ides Wong on behalf of School of Public Health