Assessment of neuromuscular function after different strength training protocols using tensiomyography

de Paula Simola, Rauno Á., Harms, Nico, Raeder, Christian, Kellmann, Michael, Meyer, Tim, Pfeiffer, Mark and Ferrauti, Alexander (2015) Assessment of neuromuscular function after different strength training protocols using tensiomyography. Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research, 29 5: 1339-1348. doi:10.1519/JSC.0000000000000768


Author de Paula Simola, Rauno Á.
Harms, Nico
Raeder, Christian
Kellmann, Michael
Meyer, Tim
Pfeiffer, Mark
Ferrauti, Alexander
Title Assessment of neuromuscular function after different strength training protocols using tensiomyography
Journal name Journal of Strength And Conditioning Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1533-4287
1064-8011
Publication date 2015-05-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1519/JSC.0000000000000768
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 29
Issue 5
Start page 1339
End page 1348
Total pages 10
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 2732 Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
3612 Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
Abstract The purpose of the study was to analyze tensiomyography (TMG) sensitivity to changes in muscle force and neuromuscular function of the muscle rectus femoris (RF) using TMG muscle properties after 5 different lower-limb strength training protocols (multiple sets; DS = drop sets; eccentric overload; FW = flywheel; PL = plyometrics). After baseline measurements, 14 male strength trained athletes completed 1 squat training protocol per week over a 5-week period in a randomized controlled order. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), TMG measurements of maximal radial displacement of the muscle belly (Dm), contraction time between 10 and 90% of Dm (Tc), and mean muscle contraction velocities from the beginning until 10% (V-10) and 90% of Dm (V-90) were analyzed up to 0.5 (post-train), 24 (post-24), and 48 hours (post-48) after the training interventions. Significant analysis of variance main effects for measurement points were found for all TMG contractile properties and MVIC (p < 0.01). Dm and V10 post-train values were significantly lower after protocols DS and FW compared with protocol PL (p = 0.032 and 0.012, respectively). Dm, V-10, and V-90 decrements correlated significantly to the decreases in MVIC (r = 0.64-0.67, p <= 0.05). Some TMG muscle properties are sensitive to changes in muscle force, and different lower-limb strength training protocols lead to changes in neuromuscular function of RF. In addition, those protocols involving high and eccentric load and a high total time under tension may induce higher changes in TMG muscle properties.
Formatted abstract
The purpose of the study was to analyse tensiomyography (TMG) sensitivity to changes in muscle force and neuromuscular function of the muscle rectus femoris (RF) using TMG muscle properties after five different lower-limb strength training protocols (MS = Multiple Sets; DS = Drop Sets; EO = Eccentric Overload; FW = Flywheel; PL = Plyometrics). After baseline measurements, 14 male strength trained athletes completed one squat training protocol per week over a five-week period in a randomized controlled order. Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC), TMG measurements of maximal radial displacement of the muscle belly (Dm), contraction time between 10 and 90% of Dm (Tc) as well as mean muscle contraction velocities from the beginning until 10% (V10), and 90% of Dm (V90) were analysed up to 0.5 hours (post-train), 24 hours (post-24) and 48 hours (post-48) after the training interventions. Significant ANOVA main effects for measurement points were found for all TMG contractile properties and MVIC (p < 0.01). Dm and V10 post-train values were significantly lower after protocols DS and FW compared to protocol PL (p = 0.032 and 0.012, respectively). Dm, V10, and V90 decrements correlated significantly to the decreases in MVIC (r = 0.64-0.67; p < 0.05). Some TMG muscle properties are sensitive to changes in muscle force and different lower-limb strength training protocols lead to changes in neuromuscular function of RF. In addition, those protocols involving high and eccentric load, and a high total time under tension may induce higher changes in TMG muscle properties.
Keyword Muscle contractile properties
Force
Strength exercises
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID IIA1-081901/12-16
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 17 Feb 2015, 21:09:37 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences