Effectiveness of powered mobility devices in community mobility-related participation: a prospective study among people with mobility

Sund, Terje, Iwarsson, Susanne, Anttila, Heidi and Brandt, Åse (2015) Effectiveness of powered mobility devices in community mobility-related participation: a prospective study among people with mobility. American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 7 8: 859-870. doi:10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.02.001


Author Sund, Terje
Iwarsson, Susanne
Anttila, Heidi
Brandt, Åse
Title Effectiveness of powered mobility devices in community mobility-related participation: a prospective study among people with mobility
Journal name American Journal of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0894-9115
1537-7385
Publication date 2015-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.pmrj.2015.02.001
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 7
Issue 8
Start page 859
End page 870
Total pages 12
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective To investigate the effectiveness of powered mobility device (i.e. powered wheelchair and scooter) interventions over a one year period in the Nordic context.

Design Prospective design.

Setting The study involved community-living participants from Denmark, Finland and Norway.

Participants In all, 180 participants with different self-reported impairments participated in the study. The mean age was 68.7 (95%CI=39.9-97.5) years and 47.8% of the participants were men.

Methods The participants were interviewed twice about mobility and mobility-related participation, face-to-face in their homes. The first interview took place shortly before the participants had received their powered mobility device and the second about one year later (mean 386.9 days SD=52.78).

Main Outcome measures Changes in frequency, ease/difficulty, and number of mobility-related participation aspects in daily life were investigated in the total sample and in sub-groups by means of the NOMO 1.0 instrument, applying structured interview format.

Results In the total sample the frequency of shopping groceries (p<.001, effect size=0.29, 95%CI=0.08-0.50), going for a walk/ride (p<.001, effect size=0.62, 95%CI=0.41-83) increased, while the number of participation aspects performed (p<0.001) increased only slightly. Going to a restaurant/café/pub, shopping groceries, other shopping, posting letters, going to the bank, the chemist’s, going for a walk/ride, and visiting family/friends became easier (p<.001to p=.001); effect sizes varied between 0.50 (95%CI=0.29-0.71) and 0.85 (95%CI=0.63-1.07). Men, scooter users, and users with poor self-reported health seem to benefit the most from the intervention.

Conclusions Powered mobility device interventions mainly contribute to mobility-related participation by making participation easier for people with mobility restrictions and by increasing the frequency of participation aspects such as shopping groceries and going for a walk/ride. The effects varied regarding the sub-groups. The present study further strengthens the current evidence that powered mobility devices increase mobility-related participation in daily life among certain subgroups of adults with mobility restrictions.
Keyword Assistive devices
Electric scooters
Electric wheelchairs
Outcome
Rehabilitation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 16 Feb 2015, 19:12:58 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work