Dermoscopic variability of basal cell carcinoma according to clinical type and anatomic location

Suppa, M., Micantonio, T., Di Stefani, A., Soyer, H. P., Chimenti, S., Fargnoli, M. C. and Peris, K. (2015) Dermoscopic variability of basal cell carcinoma according to clinical type and anatomic location. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology, 29 9: 1732-1741. doi:10.1111/jdv.12980


Author Suppa, M.
Micantonio, T.
Di Stefani, A.
Soyer, H. P.
Chimenti, S.
Fargnoli, M. C.
Peris, K.
Title Dermoscopic variability of basal cell carcinoma according to clinical type and anatomic location
Journal name Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0926-9959
1468-3083
Publication date 2015-09-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jdv.12980
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 29
Issue 9
Start page 1732
End page 1741
Total pages 10
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2016
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Correctly diagnosing basal cell carcinoma (BCC) clinical type is crucial for the therapeutic management. A systematic description of the variability of all reported BCC dermoscopic features according to clinical type and anatomic location is lacking.

Objectives: To describe the dermoscopic variability of BCC according to clinical type and anatomic location and to test the hypothesis of a clinical/dermoscopic continuum across superficial BCCs (sBCCs) with increasing palpability.

Methods: Clinical/dermoscopic images of nodular BCCs (nBCCs) and sBCCs with different degrees of palpability were retrospectively evaluated for the presence of dermoscopic criteria including degree of pigmentation, BCC-associated patterns, diverse vascular patterns, melanocytic patterns and polarized light patterns.

Results: We examined 501 histopathologically proven BCCs (66.9% sBCCs; 33.1% nBCCs), mainly located on trunk (46.7%; mostly sBCCs) and face (30.5%; mostly nBCCs). Short fine telangiectasias, leaf-like areas, spoke-wheel areas, small erosions and concentric structures were significantly associated with sBCC, whereas arborizing telangiectasias, blue-white veil-like structures, white shiny areas and rainbow pattern with nBCCs. Short fine telangiectasia, spoke-wheel areas and small erosions were independently associated with trunk location, whereas arborizing telangiectasias with facial location. Scalp BCCs had significantly more pigmentation and melanocytic criteria than BCCs located elsewhere. Multiple clinical/dermoscopic parameters displayed a significant linear trend across increasingly palpable sBCCs.

Conclusions
Particular dermoscopic criteria are independently associated with clinical type and anatomic location of BCC. Heavily pigmented, scalp BCCs are the most challenging to diagnose. A clinical/dermoscopic continuum across increasingly palpable sBCCs was detected and could be potentially important for the non-surgical management of the disease.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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