Concise review: tailoring bioengineered scaffolds for stem cell applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine

Cosson, Steffen, Otte, Ellen A., Hezaveh, Hadi and Cooper-White, Justin J. (2015) Concise review: tailoring bioengineered scaffolds for stem cell applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Stem Cells Translational Medicine, 4 2: 156-164. doi:10.5966/sctm.2014-0203


Author Cosson, Steffen
Otte, Ellen A.
Hezaveh, Hadi
Cooper-White, Justin J.
Title Concise review: tailoring bioengineered scaffolds for stem cell applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
Journal name Stem Cells Translational Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2157-6564
2157-6580
Publication date 2015-02-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.5966/sctm.2014-0203
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 4
Issue 2
Start page 156
End page 164
Total pages 9
Place of publication Durham, NC, United States
Publisher AlphaMed Press
Language eng
Subject 1309 Developmental Biology
1307 Cell Biology
Abstract The potential for the clinical application of stem cells in tissue regeneration is clearly significant. However, this potential has remained largely unrealized owing to the persistent challenges in reproducibly, with tight quality criteria, and expanding and controlling the fate of stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Tissue engineering approaches that rely on reformatting traditional Food and Drug Administrationapproved biomedical polymers from fixation devices to porous scaffolds have been shown to lack the complexity required for in vitro stem cell culture models or translation to in vivo applications with high efficacy. This realization has spurred the development of advanced mimetic biomaterials and scaffolds to increasingly enhance our ability to control the cellular microenvironment and, consequently, stemcell fate.Newinsights into thebiology of stemcells are expectedto eventuate fromtheseadvances in material science, in particular, from synthetic hydrogels that display physicochemical properties reminiscent of the natural cell microenvironment and that can be engineered to display or encode essential biological cues. Merging these advanced biomaterials with high-throughput methods to systematically, and in an unbiased manner, probe the role of scaffold biophysical and biochemical elements on stem cell fate will permit the identification of novel key stem cell behavioral effectors, allow improved in vitro replication of requisite in vivo niche functions, and, ultimately, have a profound impact on our understanding of stem cell biology and unlock their clinical potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Formatted abstract
The potential for the clinical application of stem cells in tissue regeneration is clearly significant. However, this potential has remained largely unrealized owing to the persistent challenges in reproducibly, with tight quality criteria, and expanding and controlling the fate of stem cells in vitro and in vivo. Tissue engineering approaches that rely on reformatting traditional Food and Drug Administration-approved biomedical polymers from fixation devices to porous scaffolds have been shown to lack the complexity required for in vitro stem cell culture models or translation to in vivo applications with high efficacy. This realization has spurred the development of advanced mimetic biomaterials and scaffolds to increasingly enhance our ability to control the cellular microenvironment and, consequently, stem cell fate. New insights into the biology of stem cells are expected to eventuate from these advances in material science, in particular, from synthetic hydrogels that display physicochemical properties reminiscent of the natural cell microenvironment and that can be engineered to display or encode essential biological cues. Merging these advanced biomaterials with high-throughput methods to systematically, and in an unbiased manner, probe the role of scaffold biophysical and biochemical elements on stem cell fate will permit the identification of novel key stem cell behavioral effectors, allow improved in vitro replication of requisite in vivo niche functions, and, ultimately, have a profound impact on our understanding of stem cell biology and unlock their clinical potential in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.
Keyword Stem cell
Niche
Hydrogel
Scaffold
Tissue engineering
Bioengineering
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: School of Chemical Engineering Publications
Official 2016 Collection
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 14 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 04 Feb 2015, 01:16:19 EST by Steffen Cosson on behalf of Aust Institute for Bioengineering & Nanotechnology