The Potential Benefits of Parenting Programs for Grandparents: Recommendations and Clinical Implications

Kirby, James N. (2015) The Potential Benefits of Parenting Programs for Grandparents: Recommendations and Clinical Implications. Journal of Child and Family Studies, 24 11: 3200-3212. doi:10.1007/s10826-015-0123-9


Author Kirby, James N.
Title The Potential Benefits of Parenting Programs for Grandparents: Recommendations and Clinical Implications
Journal name Journal of Child and Family Studies   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1062-1024
1573-2843
Publication date 2015-01-20
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10826-015-0123-9
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 11
Start page 3200
End page 3212
Total pages 13
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Abstract Evidence-based parenting programs (EBPPs) have helped improve the emotional, social, and behavioral outcomes of children by providing positive parenting knowledge and skills to parents. However, not all parents can participate in parenting programs, as such the field of parenting research needs to look at other environmental factors that can influence child behavior. Grandparents are an example of one such factor that can help with childhood outcomes. Grandparents provide the single most amount of child care to children in Australia, and this trend is echoed in other Western cultures such as the United States of America and the United Kingdom. This papers aims to extend the knowledge base on parenting by focusing on the impact grandparents can have on families. Specifically, this paper focuses on the following five key areas: (a) the role of grandparents in Western Cultures; (b) the relationship between grandparents' and parents; (c) interventions that are available for grandparents to assist them in their caregiving roles and whether they are effective; (d) provide recommendations to EBPPs in order to modify to the population of grandparents; and (e) discuss clinical and ethical implications of working with grandparents. Collectively, this paper will demonstrate how grandparents can be utilized in a positive way to help children and support families by providing them with access to modified EBPPs.
Formatted abstract
Evidence-based parenting programs (EBPPs) have helped improve the emotional, social, and behavioral outcomes of children by providing positive parenting knowledge and skills to parents. However, not all parents can participate in parenting programs, as such the field of parenting research needs to look at other environmental factors that can influence child behavior. Grandparents are an example of one such factor that can help with childhood outcomes. Grandparents provide the single most amount of child care to children in Australia, and this trend is echoed in other Western cultures such as the United States of America and the United Kingdom. This papers aims to extend the knowledge base on parenting by focusing on the impact grandparents can have on families. Specifically, this paper focuses on the following five key areas: (a) the role of grandparents in Western Cultures; (b) the relationship between grandparents’ and parents; (c) interventions that are available for grandparents to assist them in their caregiving roles and whether they are effective; (d) provide recommendations to EBPPs in order to modify to the population of grandparents; and (e) discuss clinical and ethical implications of working with grandparents. Collectively, this paper will demonstrate how grandparents can be utilized in a positive way to help children and support families by providing them with access to modified EBPPs.
Keyword Children
Consumers
Grandparents
Parenting
Parenting programs
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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