Keep on brushing: a longitudinal study of motivational text messaging in young adults aged 18–24 years receiving Work and Income support

Schluter, Philip, Lee, Martin, Hamilton, Greg, Coe, Gill, Messer-Perkins, Heather and Smith, Belinda (2014) Keep on brushing: a longitudinal study of motivational text messaging in young adults aged 18–24 years receiving Work and Income support. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 75 2: 1-8. doi:10.1111/jphd.12079


Author Schluter, Philip
Lee, Martin
Hamilton, Greg
Coe, Gill
Messer-Perkins, Heather
Smith, Belinda
Title Keep on brushing: a longitudinal study of motivational text messaging in young adults aged 18–24 years receiving Work and Income support
Journal name Journal of Public Health Dentistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1752-7325
0022-4006
Publication date 2014-11-19
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/jphd.12079
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 75
Issue 2
Start page 1
End page 8
Total pages 8
Place of publication Malden, MA, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: Using text messaging, underpinned by the Health Belief Model, this study aimed to improve tooth brushing frequencies among unemployed young adults aged 18–24 years.
Methods: Set within Work and Income's Linwood Community Link office (one Christchurch branch of the New Zealand Government's employment and beneficiary services), unemployed young adults aged 18–24 years with access to a mobile phone were recruited using either a purpose-built computer kiosk or Work and Income's Facebook site. Participants completed a baseline survey and then received and responded to a series of motivational text messages over 10 weeks. Self-reported tooth brushing frequency was the primary outcome variable. Important socio-demographic (age, gender, ethnicity, employment status) and method-specific (level of attrition, distribution of successful text messages deliveries, active withdrawal) variables were also collected. Longitudinal analyses of these responses employed generalized estimating equation (GEE) models.
Results: Four hundred and three registered for the trial, of whom 171 (42%) were eligible. Self-reported tooth brushing twice or more per day increased from 51% at baseline to 70% at week 3, 74% at week 6, and 73% at week 9 – an increase significant in crude (P < 0.001) and adjusted (P < 0.001) GEE analyses. No important differences were noted between age, gender, or ethnic groups, although attrition was relatively high with only 26% participating by week 9. However, no evidence of differential attrition was observed.
Conclusions: Invention through motivational text messaging improved the measured oral health self-care behavior in a hard-to-reach group carrying a disproportionately heavy oral health burden. This intervention warrants further investigation.
Keyword Epidemiology
Oral health behaviors
Hard-to-reach people
Population health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 19 November 2014. Early view.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 30 Jan 2015, 23:14:14 EST by Vicki Percival on behalf of School of Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work