Effects of incubation temperature on the energetics of embryonic development and hatchling morphology in the Brisbane river turtle Emydura signata

Booth, DT (1998) Effects of incubation temperature on the energetics of embryonic development and hatchling morphology in the Brisbane river turtle Emydura signata. Journal of Comparative Physiology B-biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology, 168 5: 399-404. doi:10.1007/s003600050159


Author Booth, DT
Title Effects of incubation temperature on the energetics of embryonic development and hatchling morphology in the Brisbane river turtle Emydura signata
Journal name Journal of Comparative Physiology B-biochemical Systemic And Environmental Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0174-1578
Publication date 1998-01-01
Year available 1998
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s003600050159
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 168
Issue 5
Start page 399
End page 404
Total pages 6
Place of publication NEW YORK
Publisher SPRINGER VERLAG
Language eng
Abstract Incubation temperature and the amount of water taken up by eggs from the substrate during incubation affects hatchling size and morphology in many oviparous reptiles. The Brisbane river turtle Emydura signata lays hard-shelled eggs and hatchling mass was unaffected by the amount of water gained or lost during incubation. Constant temperature incubation of eggs at 24 degrees C, 26 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 31 degrees C had no effect on hatchling mass, yolk-free hatchling mass, residual yolk mass, carapace length, carapace width, plastron length or plastron width. However, hatchlings incubated at 26 degrees C and 28 degrees C had wider heads than hatchlings incubated at 24 degrees C and 31 degrees C. Incubation period varied inversely with incubation temperature, while the rate of increase in oxygen consumption during the first part of incubation and the peak rate of oxygen consumption varied directly with incubation temperature. The total amount of oxygen consumed during development and hatchling production cost was significantly greater at 24 degrees C than at 26 degrees C, 28 degrees C and 31 degrees C. Hatchling mass and dimensions and total embryonic energy expenditure was directly proportional to initial egg mass.
Keyword Physiology
Zoology
Temperature
Incubation
Turtle
Embryonic Development
Oxygen Consumption
Chelydra-serpentina
Sex Determination
Eggs
Moisture
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 20:33:06 EST