Healthy, happy and ready to teach, or why kids can't learn from fat teachers: the discursive politics of school reform and teacher health

Vander Schee, Carolyn and Gard, Michael (2014) Healthy, happy and ready to teach, or why kids can't learn from fat teachers: the discursive politics of school reform and teacher health. Critical Public Health, 24 2: 210-225. doi:10.1080/09581596.2013.828152


Author Vander Schee, Carolyn
Gard, Michael
Title Healthy, happy and ready to teach, or why kids can't learn from fat teachers: the discursive politics of school reform and teacher health
Journal name Critical Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1469-3682
0958-1596
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1080/09581596.2013.828152
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 24
Issue 2
Start page 210
End page 225
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxon United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The idea of using schools for public health ends has a long and complex history. If anything, interest in the public health role of schools may actually be intensifying, perhaps driven by the attention given to a range of health matters affecting young people, notably mental illness, drugs and alcohol, and obesity. This paper deals predominantly with obesity but emerges out of our ongoing research into both the nature and consequences of policies and interventions that seek to use American public schools to prosecute public health goals. In particular, our focus is on the kinds of school-based interventions that widespread panic about childhood obesity has generated and their consequences for teachers. We take up this matter by examining how American teachers' health - and the associated responsibilities and obligations to inspire health among young people - are discursively constructed in legislation, policy documents, and academic articles. Our review and analysis of these texts reveal the presence of three distinct discursive formations: teachers as health role models, teachers as fiscal liabilities, and teachers as instruments of policy compliance. These formations, we argue, suggest a novel and, in some cases, alarming trajectory in school-based obesity policies and interventions.
Keyword Public policy
School
Teachers
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Non HERDC
Official Audit
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 20 Jan 2015, 21:11:40 EST by Ms Kate Rowe on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences