The onset and offset of psychosis - and what happens in between

McGrath, J. J., Miettunen, J., Jaaskelainen, E. and Dark, F. (2014) The onset and offset of psychosis - and what happens in between. Psychological Medicine, 44 13: 2705-2711. doi:10.1017/S0033291714001378


Author McGrath, J. J.
Miettunen, J.
Jaaskelainen, E.
Dark, F.
Title The onset and offset of psychosis - and what happens in between
Journal name Psychological Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Publication date 2014-10-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1017/S0033291714001378
Open Access Status
Volume 44
Issue 13
Start page 2705
End page 2711
Total pages 7
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract As one would expect for a heterogeneous syndrome like schizophrenia, at the individual level the course of symptoms and disability vary widely. Mindful that the definition of recovery/remission varies widely between studies, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported that the proportion of those with schizophrenia who recover on both symptom and functional outcome is modest (approximately 14%). A 10-year follow-up of the English multicentre AESOP incidence study provides more 'fine-grained' insights into the time course of symptom fluctuation for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. We highlight selected findings from the new study and speculate on the role of different outcome domains for future study (e. g. symptom, occupational/functional, cognition, physical health, patient-nominated outcomes). Because recovery is a multifaceted process, we need to develop a panel of practical and operationalizable criteria for remission and recovery.
Formatted abstract
As one would expect for a heterogeneous syndrome like schizophrenia, at the individual level the course of symptoms and disability vary widely. Mindful that the definition of recovery/remission varies widely between studies, a recent systematic review and meta-analysis reported that the proportion of those with schizophrenia who recover on both symptom and functional outcome is modest (approximately 14%). A 10-year follow-up of the English multicentre AESOP incidence study provides more ‘fine-grained’ insights into the time course of symptom fluctuation for schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. We highlight selected findings from the new study and speculate on the role of different outcome domains for future study (e.g. symptom, occupational/functional, cognition, physical health, patient-nominated outcomes). Because recovery is a multifaceted process, we need to develop a panel of practical and operationalizable criteria for remission and recovery.
Keyword Epidemiology
First-episode psychosis
Recovery
Remission
Schizophrenia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 1 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sat, 17 Jan 2015, 04:31:45 EST by System User on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute