Depressive symptoms and adverse outcomes from hospitalization in older adults: secondary outcomes of a trial of falls prevention education

Haines, Terry P., Williams, Cylie M., Hill, Anne-Marie, McPhail, Steven M., Hill, D., Brauer, Sandy G., Hoffmann, Tammy C. and Etherton-Beer, Chris (2015) Depressive symptoms and adverse outcomes from hospitalization in older adults: secondary outcomes of a trial of falls prevention education. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 60 1: 96-102. doi:10.1016/j.archger.2014.09.009

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Author Haines, Terry P.
Williams, Cylie M.
Hill, Anne-Marie
McPhail, Steven M.
Hill, D.
Brauer, Sandy G.
Hoffmann, Tammy C.
Etherton-Beer, Chris
Title Depressive symptoms and adverse outcomes from hospitalization in older adults: secondary outcomes of a trial of falls prevention education
Journal name Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-6976
0167-4943
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.archger.2014.09.009
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 60
Issue 1
Start page 96
End page 102
Total pages 7
Place of publication Shannon, Clare Ireland
Publisher Elsevier Ireland
Language eng
Subject 3306 Health (social science)
1302 Ageing
2909 Gerontology
2717 Geriatrics and Gerontology
Abstract Depression is common in older people and symptoms of depression are known to substantially increase during hospitalization. There is little known about predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults or impact of common interventions during hospitalization. This study aimed to describe the magnitude of depressive symptoms, shift of depressive symptoms and the impact of the symptoms of depression among older hospital patients during hospital admission and identify whether exposure to falls prevention education affected symptoms of depression.Participants (n = 1206) were older adults admitted within two Australian hospitals, the majority of participants completed the Geriatric Depression Scale - Short Form (GDS) at admission (n = 1168). Participants' mean age was 74.7 (±SD 11) years and 47% (n = 551) were male.At admission 53% (619 out of 1168) of participants had symptoms of clinical depression and symptoms remained at the same level at discharge for 55% (543 out of 987). Those exposed to the low intensity education program had higher GDS scores at discharge than those in the control group (low intensity vs control n = 652, adjusted regression coefficient (95% CI) = 0.24 (0.02, 0.45), p = 0.03). The only factor other than admission level of depression that affected depressive symptoms change was if the participant was worried about falling.Older patients frequently present with symptoms of clinical depression on admission to hospital. Future research should consider these factors, whether these are modifiable and whether treatment may influence outcomes.
Formatted abstract
Depression is common in older people and symptoms of depression are known to substantially increase during hospitalization. There is little known about predictors of depressive symptoms in older adults or impact of common interventions during hospitalization. This study aimed to describe the magnitude of depressive symptoms, shift of depressive symptoms and the impact of the symptoms of depression among older hospital patients during hospital admission and identify whether exposure to falls prevention education affected symptoms of depression.

Participants (n = 1206) were older adults admitted within two Australian hospitals, the majority of participants completed the Geriatric Depression Scale – Short Form (GDS) at admission (n = 1168). Participants’ mean age was 74.7 (±SD 11) years and 47% (n = 551) were male.

At admission 53% (619 out of 1168) of participants had symptoms of clinical depression and symptoms remained at the same level at discharge for 55% (543 out of 987). Those exposed to the low intensity education program had higher GDS scores at discharge than those in the control group (low intensity vs control n = 652, adjusted regression coefficient (95% CI) = 0.24 (0.02, 0.45), p = 0.03). The only factor other than admission level of depression that affected depressive symptoms change was if the participant was worried about falling.

Older patients frequently present with symptoms of clinical depression on admission to hospital. Future research should consider these factors, whether these are modifiable and whether treatment may influence outcomes.
Keyword Depression
Elderly
Hospital
Falls
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 28 Sep 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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