Prospective Relationships Between Physical Activity and Optimism in Young and Mid-Aged Women.

Pavey, Toby G., Burton, Nicola W. and Brown, Wendy J. (2015) Prospective Relationships Between Physical Activity and Optimism in Young and Mid-Aged Women.. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 12 7: 915-923. doi:10.1123/jpah.2014-0070

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Author Pavey, Toby G.
Burton, Nicola W.
Brown, Wendy J.
Title Prospective Relationships Between Physical Activity and Optimism in Young and Mid-Aged Women.
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5476
Publication date 2015-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2014-0070
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 12
Issue 7
Start page 915
End page 923
Total pages 9
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Abstract Background: There is growing evidence that regular physical activity (PA) reduces the risk of poor mental health. Less research has focused on the relationship between PA and positive wellbeing. The study aims were to assess the prospective associations between PA and optimism, in both young and mid-aged women. Methods: 9688 young women (born 1973-1978) completed self-report surveys in 2000 (age 22 to 27), 2003, 2006, and 2009; and 11,226 mid-aged women (born 1946-1951) completed surveys in 2001 (age 50-55) 2004, 2007, and 2010, as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Generalized estimating equation models (with 3-year time lag) were used to examine the relationship between PA and optimism in both cohorts. Results: In both cohorts, women reporting higher levels of PA had greater odds of reporting higher optimism over the 9-year period, (young, OR = 5.04, 95% CI: 3.85-6.59; mid-age, OR = 5.77, 95% CI: 4.76-7.00) than women who reported no PA. Odds were attenuated in adjusted models, with depression accounting for a large amount of this attenuation (young, OR = 2.00, 95% CI: 1.57-2.55; mid-age, OR = 1.64 95% CI: 1.38-1.94). Conclusions: Physical activity can promote optimism in young and mid-aged women over time, even after accounting for the negative effects of other psychosocial indicators such as depression.
Formatted abstract
Background: There is growing evidence that regular physical activity (PA) reduces the risk of poor mental health. Less research has focused on the relationship between PA and positive wellbeing. The study aims were to assess the prospective associations between PA and optimism, in both young and mid-aged women.

Methods:
9688 young women (born 1973-78) completed self-report surveys in 2000 (age 22-27), 2003, 2006, and 2009; and 11,226 mid-aged women (born 1946-51) completed surveys in 2001 (age 50 to 55) 2004, 2007 and 2010, as part of the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women’s Health. Generalised estimating equation models (with 3-year time lag) were used to examine the relationship between PA and optimism in both cohorts.

Results: In both cohorts, women reporting higher levels of PA had greater odds of reporting higher optimism over the 9-year period, (young, OR=5.04, 95%CI: 3.85-6.59; mid-age, OR=5.77, 95%CI: 4.76-7.00) than women who reported no PA. Odds were attenuated in adjusted models, with depression accounting for a large amount of this attenuation (young, OR=2.00, 95%CI: 1.57-2.55; mid-age, OR=1.64 95%CI: 1.38-1.94).

Conclusions: Physical activity can promote optimism in young and mid-aged women over time, even after accounting for the negative effects of other psychosocial indicators such as depression.
Keyword Health promotion
Exercise
Mental health
Epidemiology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 569940
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 19 Dec 2014, 21:46:26 EST by Toby Pavey on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences