Wolbachia infection does not alter attraction of the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti to human odours

Turley, A. P., Smallegange, R. C., Takken, W., Zalucki, M. P., O'neill, S. L. and McGraw, E. A. (2014) Wolbachia infection does not alter attraction of the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti to human odours. Medical and Veterinary Entomology, 28 4: 457-460. doi:10.1111/mve.12063


Author Turley, A. P.
Smallegange, R. C.
Takken, W.
Zalucki, M. P.
O'neill, S. L.
McGraw, E. A.
Title Wolbachia infection does not alter attraction of the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti to human odours
Formatted title
Wolbachia infection does not alter attraction of the mosquito Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti to human odours
Journal name Medical and Veterinary Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-283X
1365-2915
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/mve.12063
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 28
Issue 4
Start page 457
End page 460
Total pages 4
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The insect endosymbiont Wolbachia pipientis (Rickettsiales: Rickettsiaceae) is undergoing field trials around the world to determine if it can reduce transmission of dengue virus from the mosquito Stegomyia aegypti to humans. Two different Wolbachia strains have been released to date. The primary effect of the wMel strain is pathogen protection whereby infection with the symbiont limits replication of dengue virus inside the mosquito. A second strain, wMelPop, induces pathogen protection, reduces the adult mosquito lifespan and decreases blood feeding success in mosquitoes after 15 days of age. Here we test whether Wolbachia infection affects mosquito attraction to host odours in adults aged 5 and 15 days. We found no evidence of reduced odour attraction of mosquitoes, even for those infected with the more virulent wMelPop. This bodes well for fitness and competitiveness in the field given that the mosquitoes must find hosts to reproduce for the biocontrol method to succeed.
Keyword Mosquito
Odour
Symbiont
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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