Perceived self-other differences in persuasibility: the effects of interpersonal and group-based similarity

Duck, J. M., Hogg, M. A. and Terry, D. J. (1998) Perceived self-other differences in persuasibility: the effects of interpersonal and group-based similarity. European Journal of Social Psychology, 28 1: 1-21. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-0992(199801/02)28:1

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Author Duck, J. M.
Hogg, M. A.
Terry, D. J.
Title Perceived self-other differences in persuasibility: the effects of interpersonal and group-based similarity
Journal name European Journal of Social Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1099-0992
0046-2772
Publication date 1998-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1002/(SICI)1099-0992(199801/02)28:1
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 28
Issue 1
Start page 1
End page 21
Total pages 21
Place of publication The Hague
Publisher John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
Language eng
Abstract Two experiments examined the effects of interpersonal and group-based similarity on perceived self-other differences in persuasibility (i.e. on third-person effects, Davison, 1983). Results of Experiment 1 (N=121), based on experimentally-created groups, indicated that third-person perceptions with respect to the impact of televised product ads were accentuated when the comparison was made with interpersonally different others. Contrary to predictions, third-person perceptions were not affected by group-based similarity (i.e. ingroup or outgroup other). Results of Experiment 2 (N = 102), based an an enduring social identity, indicated that both interpersonal and group-based similarity moderated perceptions of the impact on self and other of least-liked product ads. Overall, third-person effects were more pronounced with respect to interpersonally dissimilar others. However, when social identity was salient, information about interpersonal similarity of the target did not affect perceived self-other differences with respect to ingroup targets. Results also highlighted significant differences in third-person perceptions according to the perceiver's affective evaluation of the persuasive message. (C) 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Keyword Psychology, Social
Social Categorization
Repulsion Hypothesis
Unrealistic Optimism
Collective Self
Mass-media
Attraction
Impact
Dissimilarity
Attitudes
Biases
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown
Additional Notes This is an author version of an article originally published as Duck, J. M., Hogg, M. A. and Terry, D. J. (1998) Perceived self-other differences in persuasibility: the effects of interpersonal and group-based similarity. European Journal of Social Psychology, 28 1: 1-21. doi:10.1002/(SICI)1099-0992(199801/02)28:1<1::AID-EJSP842>3.0.CO;2-X Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons. All rights reserved. http://www.interscience.wiley.com

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences - Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 20:21:05 EST