Probable oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) tunnels and faecal pellets in silicified conifer wood from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Turonian) portion of the Winton Formation, central-western Queensland, Australia

Fletcher, Tamara L. and Salisbury, Steven W. (2014) Probable oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) tunnels and faecal pellets in silicified conifer wood from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Turonian) portion of the Winton Formation, central-western Queensland, Australia. Alcheringa, 38 4: 541-545. doi:10.1080/03115518.2014.912557


Author Fletcher, Tamara L.
Salisbury, Steven W.
Title Probable oribatid mite (Acari: Oribatida) tunnels and faecal pellets in silicified conifer wood from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Turonian) portion of the Winton Formation, central-western Queensland, Australia
Journal name Alcheringa   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1752-0754
0311-5518
Publication date 2014-05-29
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/03115518.2014.912557
Volume 38
Issue 4
Start page 541
End page 545
Total pages 5
Place of publication Abingdon Oxfordshire United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Language eng
Abstract Tunnels and faecal pellets likely made by oribatid mites have been found in silicified conifer wood from the Upper Cretaceous (Cenomanian–Turonian) portion of the Winton Formation, central-western Queensland, Australia. Although this is the first identified and described record of oribatid mites in the Mesozoic of Australia, other published, but unassigned material may also be referable to Oribatida. Current understanding of the climatic significance of mite distribution is limited, but the presence of oribatids and absence of xylophagus insects in the upper portion of the Winton Formation are consistent with indications that the environment in which this unit was deposited was relatively warm and wet for its palaeolatitude. Such traces may provide useful and durable proxy evidence of palaeoclimate, but more detailed investigation of modern taxa and their relationship to climate is still needed.
Keyword Wood-borer
Xylophagy
Ichnofossil
Mesozoic
Plant-animal interactions
Arthropods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 07 Dec 2014, 11:05:50 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences