An empirical exploration of metacognitive assessment activities in a third-year civil engineering hydraulics course

Meyer, Jan H. F., Knight, David B., Callaghan, David P. and Baldock, Tom E. (2014) An empirical exploration of metacognitive assessment activities in a third-year civil engineering hydraulics course. European Journal of Engineering Education, 40 3: 309-327. doi:10.1080/03043797.2014.960367


Author Meyer, Jan H. F.
Knight, David B.
Callaghan, David P.
Baldock, Tom E.
Title An empirical exploration of metacognitive assessment activities in a third-year civil engineering hydraulics course
Journal name European Journal of Engineering Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0304-3797
1469-5898
Publication date 2014-11-14
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/03043797.2014.960367
Open Access Status
Volume 40
Issue 3
Start page 309
End page 327
Total pages 19
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxfordshire, United Kingdom
Publisher Taylor and Francis
Language eng
Subject 3304 Education
2200 Engineering
Abstract Threshold concepts are transformative, integrative, and provocative; understanding these difficult concepts allows students to be capable of solving advanced problems. This investigation and evaluation of a metacognitive curricular approach explore variation in students' and teachers' discernment of structural complexity of concepts and its potential for enhancing students' learning and conceptual understanding of threshold concepts. Three trials of a metacognitive assessment activity administered to two cohorts of a civil engineering course (n = 276 and n = 264) were investigated. Students were presented with several answers (varying in structural complexity) to a question about a threshold concept and asked to mark each response. Quantitative analyses compared students' and teachers' marking schemes within and across trials, and qualitative analyses explored students' written reflections following the activity. Students' justifications for their marking schemes, their reflections on the activity's usefulness, and the convergence of students' and teachers' marking schemes suggest that the activity supported deep forms of student learning.
Formatted abstract
Threshold concepts are transformative, integrative, and provocative; understanding these difficult concepts allows students to be capable of solving advanced problems. This investigation and evaluation of a metacognitive curricular approach explore variation in students' and teachers' discernment of structural complexity of concepts and its potential for enhancing students' learning and conceptual understanding of threshold concepts. Three trials of a metacognitive assessment activity administered to two cohorts of a civil engineering course (n = 276 and n = 264) were investigated. Students were presented with several answers (varying in structural complexity) to a question about a threshold concept and asked to mark each response. Quantitative analyses compared students' and teachers' marking schemes within and across trials, and qualitative analyses explored students' written reflections following the activity. Students' justifications for their marking schemes, their reflections on the activity's usefulness, and the convergence of students' and teachers' marking schemes suggest that the activity supported deep forms of student learning.
Keyword Formative assessment
Metacognition
Threshold concepts
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 05 Dec 2014, 08:34:02 EST by Jeannette Watson on behalf of School of Civil Engineering