Non-occupational sitting and mental well-being in employed adults

Atkin, Andrew J., Adams, Emma, Bull, Fiona C. and Biddle, Stuart J. H. (2012) Non-occupational sitting and mental well-being in employed adults. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 43 2: 181-188. doi:10.1007/s12160-011-9320-y

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Author Atkin, Andrew J.
Adams, Emma
Bull, Fiona C.
Biddle, Stuart J. H.
Title Non-occupational sitting and mental well-being in employed adults
Journal name Annals of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 08836612
1532-4796
Publication date 2012-04-01
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-011-9320-y
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 43
Issue 2
Start page 181
End page 188
Total pages 8
Place of publication New York, NY United States
Publisher Springer New York LLC
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background
Emerging evidence suggests that sedentary behaviour may be adversely associated with physical health, but few studies have examined the association with mental well-being.

Purpose
This study examined the association of four non-occupational sedentary behaviours, individually and in total, with mental well-being in employed adults.

Methods
Baseline data from the evaluation of Well@Work, a national workplace health promotion project conducted in the UK, were used. Participants self-reported sitting time whilst watching television, using a computer, socialising and travelling by motorised transport. Mental well-being was assessed by the 12-item version of the general health questionnaire. Analyses were conducted using multiple linear regression.

Results
In models adjusted for multiple confounders, TV viewing, computer use and total non-occupational sitting time were adversely associated with general health questionnaire-12 assessed mental well-being in women. Computer use only was found to be adversely associated with mental well-being in men.

Conclusion
Sedentary behaviour may be adversely associated with mental well-being in employed adults. The association may be moderated by gender.
Keyword Sedentary Behaviour
Sitting time
Mental well being
Effect modification
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 04 Dec 2014, 19:25:02 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences