Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis

Wilmot, E. G., Edwardson, C. L., Achana, F. A., Davies, M. J., Gorely, T., Gray, L. J., Khunti, K., Yates, T. and Biddle, S. J. H. (2012) Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis. Diabetologia, 55 11: 2895-2905. doi:10.1007/s00125-012-2677-z

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Author Wilmot, E. G.
Edwardson, C. L.
Achana, F. A.
Davies, M. J.
Gorely, T.
Gray, L. J.
Khunti, K.
Yates, T.
Biddle, S. J. H.
Title Sedentary time in adults and the association with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and death: systematic review and meta-analysis
Journal name Diabetologia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-186X
1432-0428
Publication date 2012-11-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00125-012-2677-z
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 55
Issue 11
Start page 2895
End page 2905
Total pages 11
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Aims/hypothesis: Sedentary (sitting) behaviours are ubiquitous in modern society. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to examine the association of sedentary time with diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality.

Methods: Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library databases were searched for terms related to sedentary time and health outcomes. Cross-sectional and prospective studies were included. RR/HR and 95% CIs were extracted by two independent reviewers. Data were adjusted for baseline event rate and pooled using a random-effects model. Bayesian predictive effects and intervals were calculated to indicate the variance in outcomes that would be expected if new studies were conducted in the future.

Results: Eighteen studies (16 prospective, two cross-sectional) were included, with 794,577 participants. Fifteen of these studies were moderate to high quality. The greatest sedentary time compared with the lowest was associated with a 112% increase in the RR of diabetes (RR 2.12; 95%credible interval [CrI] 1.61, 2.78), a 147%increase in the RR of cardiovascular events (RR 2.47; 95% CI 1.44, 4.24), a 90% increase in the risk of cardiovascular mortality (HR 1.90; 95%CrI 1.36, 2.66) and a 49%increase in the risk of all-cause mortality (HR 1.49; 95% CrI 1.14, 2.03). The predictive effects and intervals were only significant for diabetes.

Conclusions/interpretation: Sedentary time is associated with an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality; the strength of the association is most consistent for diabetes.
Keyword Cardiovascular
Diabetes
Meta-analysis
Mortality
Sedentary
Systematic review
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Dec 2014, 02:43:18 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences