The use of pedometers for monitoring physical activity in children and adolescents: measurement considerations

Clemes, Stacy A. and Biddle, Stuart J. H. (2013) The use of pedometers for monitoring physical activity in children and adolescents: measurement considerations. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 10 2: 249-262.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Clemes, Stacy A.
Biddle, Stuart J. H.
Title The use of pedometers for monitoring physical activity in children and adolescents: measurement considerations
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2013-02-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 10
Issue 2
Start page 249
End page 262
Total pages 14
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Pedometers are increasingly being used to measure physical activity in children and adolescents. This review provides an overview of common measurement issues relating to their use.

Methods: Studies addressing the following measurement issues in children/adolescents (aged 3–18 years) were included: pedometer validity and reliability, monitoring period, wear time, reactivity, and data treatment and reporting. Pedometer surveillance studies in children/adolescents (aged: 4–18 years) were also included to enable common measurement protocols to be highlighted.

Results: In children > 5 years, pedometers provide a valid and reliable, objective measure of ambulatory activity. Further evidence is required on pedometer validity in preschool children. Across all ages, optimal monitoring frames to detect habitual activity have yet to be determined; most surveillance studies use 7 days. It is recommended that standardized wear time criteria are established for different age groups, and that wear times are reported. As activity varies between weekdays and weekend days, researchers interested in habitual activity should include both types of day in surveillance studies. There is conflicting evidence on the presence of reactivity to pedometers.

Conclusions: Pedometers are a suitable tool to objectively assess ambulatory activity in children (> 5 years) and adolescents. This review provides recommendations to enhance the standardization of measurement protocols.
Keyword Validity and reliability
Monitoring frame
Reactivity
Data treatment and reporting
Instrument choice
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article available online at http://journals.humankinetics.com.ezproxy.library.uq.edu.au/AcuCustom/Sitename/Documents/DocumentItem/14_clemes_JPAH_20100328-ej.pdf

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Dec 2014, 02:35:18 EST by Sandrine Ducrot on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences