Incubation of turtle eggs at different temperatures: Do embryos compensate for temperature during development?

Booth, David T. (1998) Incubation of turtle eggs at different temperatures: Do embryos compensate for temperature during development?. Physiological Zoology, 71 1: 23-26.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
UQ34640_OA.pdf Full text (open access) application/pdf 193.41KB 0
Author Booth, David T.
Title Incubation of turtle eggs at different temperatures: Do embryos compensate for temperature during development?
Journal name Physiological Zoology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0031-935X
Publication date 1998-01-01
Year available 1998
Sub-type Article (original research)
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 71
Issue 1
Start page 23
End page 26
Total pages 4
Place of publication Chicago, IL United States
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Language eng
Abstract Freshwater turtle eggs are normally subjected to fluctuations in incubation temperature during natural incubation. Because of this, developing embryos may make physiological adjustments to growth and metabolism in response to incubation at different temperatures. I tested this hypothesis by incubating eggs of the Brisbane river turtle Emydura signata under four different temperature regimes, constant temperatures of 24 degrees C and 31 degrees C throughout incubation, and two swapped-temperature treatments where incubation temperature was changed approximately halfway through incubation. Incubation at 31 degrees C took 42 d, and incubation at 24 degrees C look 78 d, with intermediate incubation periods for the swapped-temperature treatments. Hatchling mass, hatchling size, and total oxygen consumed during development were similar for all incubation regimes. The pattern of oxygen consumption during the last phase of incubation as reflected by rate of increase of oxygen consumption, peak oxygen consumption, and fall in oxygen consumption before hatching was determined solely by the incubation temperature during the last phase of incubation; that is, incubation temperature during the first phase of incubation had no influence on these factors. Thus there is no evidence of temperature compensation in growth or development during embryonic development of E. signata eggs.
Keyword Physiology
Zoology
Metabolism
Growth
Patterns
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Biological Sciences Publications
Ecology Centre Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 28 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 13 Aug 2007, 20:19:51 EST