Individual, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of 4-year declines in walking among middle-to-older aged adults

Shimura, Hiroko, Winkler, Elisabeth and Owen, Neville (2014) Individual, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of 4-year declines in walking among middle-to-older aged adults. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 6: 1078-1084. doi:10.1123/jpah.2012-0244


Author Shimura, Hiroko
Winkler, Elisabeth
Owen, Neville
Title Individual, psychosocial, and environmental correlates of 4-year declines in walking among middle-to-older aged adults
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-5476
1543-3080
Publication date 2014-08-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2012-0244
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 11
Issue 6
Start page 1078
End page 1084
Total pages 7
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: We examined associations of individual, psychosocial and environmental characteristics with 4-year changes in walking among middle-to-older aged adults; few such studies have employed prospective designs. Methods: Walking for transport and walking for recreation were assessed during 2003–2004 (baseline) and 2007–2008 (follow-up) among 445 adults aged 50–65 years residing in Adelaide, Australia. Logistic regression analyses examined predictors of being in the highest quintile of decline in walking (21.4 minutes/day or more reduction in walking for transport; 18.6 minutes/day or more reduction in walking for recreation). Results: Declines in walking for transport were related to higher level of walking at baseline, low perceived benefits of activity, low family social support, a medium level of social interaction, low sense of community, and higher neighborhood walkability. Declines in walking for recreation were related to higher level of walking at baseline, low self-efficacy for activity, low family social support, and a medium level of available walking facilities. Conclusions: Declines in middle-to-older aged adults’ walking for transport and walking for recreation have differing personal, psychosocial and built-environment correlates, for which particular preventive strategies may be developed. Targeted campaigns, community-based programs, and environmental and policy initiatives can be informed by these findings.
Keyword Physical activity
Built environment
Psychosocial factors
Health promotion
Aging
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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