The hydrological legacy of deforestation on global wetlands

Woodward, C., Shulmeister, J., Larsen, J., Jacobsen, G. and Zawadzki, A. (2014) The hydrological legacy of deforestation on global wetlands. Science, 346 6211: 844-847. doi:10.1126/science.1260510

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Author Woodward, C.
Shulmeister, J.
Larsen, J.
Jacobsen, G.
Zawadzki, A.
Title The hydrological legacy of deforestation on global wetlands
Journal name Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1095-9203
0036-8075
Publication date 2014-11-14
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1126/science.1260510
Volume 346
Issue 6211
Start page 844
End page 847
Total pages 4
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Association for the Advancement of Science
Language eng
Abstract Increased catchment erosion and nutrient loading are commonly recognized impacts of deforestation on global wetlands. In contrast, an increase in water availability in deforested catchments is well known in modern studies but is rarely considered when evaluating past human impacts. We used a Budyko water balance approach, a meta-analysis of global wetland response to deforestation, and paleoecological studies from Australasia to explore this issue. After complete deforestation, we demonstrated that water available to wetlands increases by up to 15% of annual precipitation. This can convert ephemeral swamps to permanent lakes or even create new wetlands. This effect is globally significant, with 9 to 12% of wetlands affected, including 20 to 40% of Ramsar wetlands, but is widely unrecognized because human impact studies rarely test for it.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Geography, Planning and Environmental Management Publications
Official 2015 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 27 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 29 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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