Regulatory focus moderates the relationship between task control and physiological and psychological markers of stress: a work simulation study

Parker, Stacey L., Laurie, Kaitlan R., Newton, Cameron J. and Jimmieson, Nerina L. (2014) Regulatory focus moderates the relationship between task control and physiological and psychological markers of stress: a work simulation study. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 94 3: 390-398. doi:10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.10.009


Author Parker, Stacey L.
Laurie, Kaitlan R.
Newton, Cameron J.
Jimmieson, Nerina L.
Title Regulatory focus moderates the relationship between task control and physiological and psychological markers of stress: a work simulation study
Journal name International Journal of Psychophysiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1872-7697
0167-8760
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.10.009
Open Access Status
Volume 94
Issue 3
Start page 390
End page 398
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 2800 Neuroscience
3206 Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
2737 Physiology (medical)
Abstract This experiment examined whether trait regulatory focus moderates the effects of task control on stress reactions during a demanding work simulation. Regulatory focus describes two ways in which individuals self-regulate toward desired goals: promotion and prevention. As highly promotion-focused individuals are oriented toward growth and challenge, it was expected that they would show better adaptation to demanding work under high task control. In contrast, as highly prevention-focused individuals are oriented toward safety and responsibility they were expected to show better adaptation under low task control. Participants (N = 110) completed a measure of trait regulatory focus and then three trials of a demanding inbox activity under either low, neutral, or high task control. Heart rate variability (HRV), affective reactions (anxiety & task dissatisfaction), and task performance were measured at each trial. As predicted, highly promotion-focused individuals found high (compared to neutral) task control stress-buffering for performance. Moreover, highly prevention-focused individuals found high (compared to low) task control stress-exacerbating for dissatisfaction. In addition, highly prevention-focused individuals found low task control stress-buffering for dissatisfaction, performance, and HRV. However, these effects of low task control for highly prevention-focused individuals depended on their promotion focus.
Keyword Regulatory focus
Task control
Heart rate variability
Occupational stress
Work simulation
Task performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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