Efficacy and safety of oral methazolamide in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind study

Simpson, Richard W., Nicholson, Geoffrey C., Proietto, Joseph, Sarah, Alana, Sanders, Kerrie M., Phillips, Gabrielle, Chambers, Jo, MacGinley, Rob, Orford, Neil, Walder, Ken, Krippner, Guy, Skoff, Kathy and Wacher, Vincent J. (2014) Efficacy and safety of oral methazolamide in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Diabetes Care, 37 11: 3121-3123. doi:10.2337/dc14-1038


Author Simpson, Richard W.
Nicholson, Geoffrey C.
Proietto, Joseph
Sarah, Alana
Sanders, Kerrie M.
Phillips, Gabrielle
Chambers, Jo
MacGinley, Rob
Orford, Neil
Walder, Ken
Krippner, Guy
Skoff, Kathy
Wacher, Vincent J.
Title Efficacy and safety of oral methazolamide in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 24-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind study
Journal name Diabetes Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1935-5548
0149-5992
Publication date 2014-11-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.2337/dc14-1038
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 37
Issue 11
Start page 3121
End page 3123
Total pages 3
Place of publication Alexandria, VA, United States
Publisher American Diabetes Association
Language eng
Subject 2724 Internal Medicine
2712 Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
2902 Advanced and Specialised Nursing
Abstract OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of methazolamide as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: This double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized 76 patients to oral methazolamide (40 mg b.i.d.) or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point for methazolamide treatment was a placebo-corrected reduction in HbA1c from baseline after 24 weeks (ΔHbA1c). RESULTS: Mean ± SD baseline HbA1c was 7.1 ± 0.7% (54 ± 5 mmol/mol; n 5 37) and 7.4 ± 0.6% (57 ± 5 mmol/mol; n 5 39) in the methazolamide and placebo groups, respectively. Methazolamide treatment was associated with a ΔHbA1c of -0.39% (95% CI -0.82, 0.04; P < 0.05) (-4.3 mmol/mol [- 9.0, 0.4]), an increase in the proportion of patients achieving HbA1c≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol) from 8 to 33%, a rapid reduction in alanine aminotransferase (∼10 units/L), and weight loss (2%) in metformin-cotreated patients. CONCLUSIONS: Methazolamide is the archetype for a new intervention in type 2 diabetes with clinical benefits beyond glucose control.
Formatted abstract
OBJECTIVE To evaluate the safety and efficacy of methazolamide as a potential therapy for type 2 diabetes.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS
This double-blind, placebo-controlled study randomized 76 patients to oral methazolamide (40 mg b.i.d.) or placebo for 24 weeks. The primary efficacy end point for methazolamide treatment was a placebo-corrected reduction in HbA1c from baseline after 24 weeks (ΔHbA1c).

RESULTS Mean ± SD baseline HbA1c was 7.1 ± 0.7% (54 ± 5 mmol/mol; n = 37) and 7.4 ± 0.6% (57 ± 5 mmol/mol; n = 39) in the methazolamide and placebo groups, respectively. Methazolamide treatment was associated with a ΔHbA1c of –0.39% (95% CI –0.82, 0.04; P < 0.05) (–4.3 mmol/mol [–9.0, 0.4]), an increase in the proportion of patients achieving HbA1c ≤6.5% (48 mmol/mol) from 8 to 33%, a rapid reduction in alanine aminotransferase (∼10 units/L), and weight loss (2%) in metformin-cotreated patients.

CONCLUSIONS Methazolamide is the archetype for a new intervention in type 2 diabetes with clinical benefits beyond glucose control.
Keyword Endocrinology & Metabolism
Endocrinology & Metabolism
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Medicine Publications
 
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