Supportive care needs and preferences of lung cancer patients: a semi-structured qualitative interview study

Brown, Natasha M. K., Lui, Chi-Wai, Robinson, Peter C. and Boyle, Frances M. (2014) Supportive care needs and preferences of lung cancer patients: a semi-structured qualitative interview study. Supportive Care in Cancer, 23 6: 1533-1539. doi:10.1007/s00520-014-2508-5


Author Brown, Natasha M. K.
Lui, Chi-Wai
Robinson, Peter C.
Boyle, Frances M.
Title Supportive care needs and preferences of lung cancer patients: a semi-structured qualitative interview study
Journal name Supportive Care in Cancer   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0941-4355
1433-7339
Publication date 2014-11-14
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s00520-014-2508-5
Volume 23
Issue 6
Start page 1533
End page 1539
Total pages 7
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Lung cancer patients report both high levels of unmet supportive care need and underutilisation of support services, but the existing literature offers limited understanding of their specific needs and preferences for help. This study aimed to address this research gap through qualitative exploration of the supportive care needs and preferences of lung cancer patients.

Methods: 
Semi-structured interviews were conducted with ten lung cancer patients recruited from the Chest Clinic, Royal Adelaide Hospital (South Australia). Interviews particularly focussed on four key supportive care domains: medical information, physical symptoms, activities of daily living and emotional needs.

Results: 
Participants reported low use of supportive care services and resources in all four domains. Verbal information from doctors was preferred over printed or online information, and upfront and honest communication was highly valued. Attitude was viewed as important for coping with physical symptoms. Participants demonstrated strong determination to manage activities of daily living independently and, when this was not possible, preferred to seek help from family over external organisations. Support groups and helplines were not utilised for a variety of reasons, although several benefits of connecting with fellow cancer patients were identified.

Conclusions: 
The reasons behind underutilisation of supportive care services by lung cancer patients are more complex than simple lack of awareness or availability of services. Information about patients’ needs and preferences reveals opportunities for service improvement and alternative models of supportive care.
Keyword Lung cancer
Supportive care
Supportive care needs
Support services
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 21 Nov 2014, 19:43:34 EST by Dr Fran Boyle on behalf of School of Public Health