Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits

Verweij, Karin J. H., Burri, Andrea V. and Zietsch, Brendan P. (2014) Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits. Evolution and Human Behavior, 35 6: 497-501. doi:10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2014.06.009

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Author Verweij, Karin J. H.
Burri, Andrea V.
Zietsch, Brendan P.
Title Testing the prediction from sexual selection of a positive genetic correlation between human mate preferences and corresponding traits
Journal name Evolution and Human Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1090-5138
Publication date 2014-11-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.evolhumbehav.2014.06.009
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 35
Issue 6
Start page 497
End page 501
Total pages 5
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Subject 1105 Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
1201 Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
Abstract Sexual selection can cause evolution in traits that affect mating success, and it has thus been implicated in the evolution of human physical and behavioural traits that influence attractiveness. We use a large sample of identical and nonidentical female twins to test the prediction from mate choice models that a trait under sexual selection will be positively genetically correlated with preference for that trait. Six of the eight preferences we investigated, i.e. height, hair colour, intelligence, creativity, exciting personality, and religiosity, exhibited significant positive genetic correlations with the corresponding traits, while the personality measures ‘easy going’ and ‘kind and understanding’ exhibited no phenotypic or genetic correlation between preference and trait. The positive results provide important evidence consistent with the involvement of sexual selection in the evolution of these human traits.
Keyword Twin study
Heritability
Mate choice
Fisherian runaway
Good genes
Signal
Display
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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