Is the pharmacy profession innovative enough?: meeting the needs of Australian residents with chronic conditions and their carers using the nominal group technique

McMillan, Sara S., Sav, Adem, Kelly, Fiona, King, Michelle A., Whitty, Jennifer A. and Wheeler, Amanda J. (2014) Is the pharmacy profession innovative enough?: meeting the needs of Australian residents with chronic conditions and their carers using the nominal group technique. BMC Health Services Research, 14 476: 1-9. doi:10.1186/1472-6963-14-476


Author McMillan, Sara S.
Sav, Adem
Kelly, Fiona
King, Michelle A.
Whitty, Jennifer A.
Wheeler, Amanda J.
Title Is the pharmacy profession innovative enough?: meeting the needs of Australian residents with chronic conditions and their carers using the nominal group technique
Journal name BMC Health Services Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1472-6963
Publication date 2014-10-04
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1472-6963-14-476
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 14
Issue 476
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Community pharmacies are ideally located as a source of support for people with chronic conditions. Yet, we have limited insight into what innovative pharmacy services would support this consumer group to manage their condition/s. The aim of this study was to identify what innovations people with chronic conditions and their carers want from their ideal community pharmacy, and compare with what pharmacists and pharmacy support staff think consumers want.

Methods

We elicited ideas using the nominal group technique. Participants included people with chronic conditions, unpaid carers, pharmacists and pharmacy support staff, in four regions of Australia. Themes were identified via thematic analysis using the constant comparison method.

Results

Fifteen consumer/carer, four pharmacist and two pharmacy support staff groups were conducted. Two overarching themes were identified: extended scope of practice for the pharmacist and new or improved pharmacy services. The most innovative role for Australian pharmacists was medication continuance, within a limited time-frame. Consumers and carers wanted improved access to pharmacists, but this did not necessarily align with a faster or automated dispensing service. Other ideas included streamlined access to prescriptions via medication reminders, electronic prescriptions and a chronic illness card.

Conclusions

This study provides further support for extending the pharmacist’s role in medication continuance, particularly as it represents the consumer’s voice. How this is done, or the methods used, needs to optimise patient safety. A range of innovative strategies were proposed and Australian community pharmacies should advocate for and implement innovative approaches to improve access and ensure continuity of care.
Keyword Pharmacies
Nominal group technique
Prescribing
Innovation
Chronic disease
Australia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Pharmacy Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 11 Nov 2014, 10:34:12 EST by System User on behalf of School of Pharmacy