The spider does not always win the fight for attention: disengagement from threat is modulated by goal set

Vromen, Joyce M. G., Lipp, Ottmar V. and Remington, Roger W. (2014) The spider does not always win the fight for attention: disengagement from threat is modulated by goal set. Cognition and Emotion, 29 7: 1185-1196. doi:10.1080/02699931.2014.969198


Author Vromen, Joyce M. G.
Lipp, Ottmar V.
Remington, Roger W.
Title The spider does not always win the fight for attention: disengagement from threat is modulated by goal set
Journal name Cognition and Emotion   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1464-0600
0269-9931
Publication date 2014-10-20
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02699931.2014.969198
Open Access Status
Volume 29
Issue 7
Start page 1185
End page 1196
Total pages 12
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract Stimulus-driven preferential attention to threat can be modulated by goal-driven attention. However, it remains unclear how this goal-driven modulation affects specific attentional components implied in threat interference. We hypothesise that goal-driven modulation most strongly impacts delayed disengagement from threat. A spatial cueing task was used that disentangles delayed disengagement from attentional capture by tightly manipulating the locus of attention at the time of target onset. Different top-down goals were induced by instructing participants to identify bird/fish targets (Experiment 1) or spider/cat targets (Experiment 2) among animal non-targets. Delayed disengagement from a non-target spider was observed only when the spider was part of the target set, not when it was task-irrelevant. This corroborates evidence that threat stimuli do not necessarily override goal-driven attentional control and that extended processing of threatening distractors is not obligatory.
Keyword Threat
Fear
Attention
Goal-driven
Stimulus-driven
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID DP110100460
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 20 October 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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