Estimating service demand for respite care among informal carers of people with psychological disabilities in Australia

Harris, Meredith, Diminic, Sandra, Marshall, Caroline, Stockings, Emily and Degenhardt, Louisa (2015) Estimating service demand for respite care among informal carers of people with psychological disabilities in Australia. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 39 3: 284-292. doi:10.1111/1753-6405.12337


Author Harris, Meredith
Diminic, Sandra
Marshall, Caroline
Stockings, Emily
Degenhardt, Louisa
Title Estimating service demand for respite care among informal carers of people with psychological disabilities in Australia
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2015-02-25
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/1753-6405.12337
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 39
Issue 3
Start page 284
End page 292
Total pages 9
Place of publication North Sydney, NSW, Australia
Publisher New South Wales Ministry of Health
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To estimate service demand (willingness to seek or use services) for respite care among informal, primary carers of people with a psychological disability, and to describe their characteristics.

Methods: Analysis of data from the household component of the 2009 Survey of Disability Ageing and Carers (N=64,213 persons).

Results: In Australia in 2009, 1.0% of people aged 15 years or over (177,900 persons) provided informal, primary care to a co-resident with a psychological disability. One-quarter (27.2%) of these carers reported service demand for respite care, of whom one-third had used respite services in the past three months and four-fifths had an unmet need for any or more respite care. Significantly greater percentages of carers with service demand for respite care spent 40 or more hours per week on caregiving, provided care to a person with profound activity restrictions, and reported unmet support needs, compared to carers without service demand. Lack of suitable, available respite care models was a barrier to utilisation.

Conclusions: Findings confirm significant service demand for, and under-utilisation of, respite care among mental health carers. Implications: Increased coverage of respite services, more flexible service delivery models matched to carers’ needs, and better integration with other support services are indicated
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2016 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 06 Nov 2014, 19:38:53 EST by Jon Swabey on behalf of School of Public Health