A decade of data linkage in Western Australia: strategic design, applications and benefits of the WA data linkage system

Holman, C. D'Arcy J., Bass, A. John, Rosman, Diana L., Smith, Merran B., Semmens, James B., Glasson, Emma J., Brook, Emma L., Trutwein, Brooke, Rouse, Ian L., Watson, Charles R., de Klerk, Nicholas H. and Stanley, Fiona J. (2008) A decade of data linkage in Western Australia: strategic design, applications and benefits of the WA data linkage system. Australian Health Review, 32 4: 766-777. doi:10.1071/AH080766


Author Holman, C. D'Arcy J.
Bass, A. John
Rosman, Diana L.
Smith, Merran B.
Semmens, James B.
Glasson, Emma J.
Brook, Emma L.
Trutwein, Brooke
Rouse, Ian L.
Watson, Charles R.
de Klerk, Nicholas H.
Stanley, Fiona J.
Title A decade of data linkage in Western Australia: strategic design, applications and benefits of the WA data linkage system
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2008-11-01
Year available 2008
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH080766
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 766
End page 777
Total pages 12
Place of publication Clayton, VIC Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objectives: The report describes the strategic design, steps to full implementation and outcomes achieved by the Western Australian Data Linkage System (WADLS), instigated in 1995 to link up to 40 years of data from over 30 collections for an historical population of 3.7 million. Staged development has seen its expansion, initially from a linkage key to local health data sets, to encompass links to national and local health and welfare data sets, genealogical links and spatial references for mapping applications.

Applications: The WADLS has supported over 400 studies with over 250 journal publications and 35 graduate research degrees. Applications have occurred in health services utilisation and outcomes, aetiologic research, disease surveillance and needs analysis, and in methodologic research.

Benefits: Longitudinal studies have become cheaper and more complete; deletion of duplicate records and correction of data artifacts have enhanced the quality of information assets; data linkage has conserved patient privacy; community machinery necessary for organised responses to health and social problems has been exercised; and the commercial return on research infrastructure investment has exceeded 1000%. Most importantly, there have been unbiased contributions to medical knowledge and identifiable advances in population health arising from the research.
Keyword Population Based Linkage
Record Linkage
Psychiatric patients
Rich Environment
Health Services
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Oct 2014, 02:40:29 EST by Sylvie Pichelin on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute