Ability for aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) to survive at the climatic limits of its potential range in Eastern Australia

Nicholson, J., Ritchie, S. A., Russell, R. C., Zalucki, M. P. and Van den Hurk, A. F. (2014) Ability for aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) to survive at the climatic limits of its potential range in Eastern Australia. Journal of Medical Entomology, 51 5: 948-957. doi:10.1603/ME14079


Author Nicholson, J.
Ritchie, S. A.
Russell, R. C.
Zalucki, M. P.
Van den Hurk, A. F.
Title Ability for aedes albopictus (Diptera: Culicidae) to survive at the climatic limits of its potential range in Eastern Australia
Journal name Journal of Medical Entomology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-2585
1938-2928
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1603/ME14079
Volume 51
Issue 5
Start page 948
End page 957
Total pages 10
Publisher Entomological Society of America
Collection year 2015
Language eng
Abstract Aedes albopictus (Skuse) is one of the most invasive mosquito species in the world and has infested islands in the Torres Strait, off the northern coast of Australia since at least 2004. This has led to fears that it may establish on the Australian mainland, including highly populated cities in southern temperate regions. To supplement theoretical projections addressing the range expansion of Ae. albopictus into Australia, laboratory-based trials were conducted to assess the performance of a Torres Strait Ae. albopictus population under a range of Australian conditions. First-instar larvae were placed in individual microcosms and maintained on a natural food resource, under average climatic conditions representing different regions of Australia's east coast. Larvae could not survive winter conditions in southern Australia. As the population performance index was >1.0 for tropical winter and summer conditions, and temperate summer conditions, populations would likely increase during these times. To test whether Ae. albopictus could overwinter during adverse conditions as eggs, we exposed cohorts to four different temperature (7, 17, 27, and 33°C) and relative humidity (35, 55, and 80%) combinations for up to 3 mo. High temperatures and low humidity were most detrimental to egg survival. However, those eggs maintained under cooler climates remained viable after 3 mo, including 17% of eggs kept at 7°C. Overall, this study suggests that a Torres Strait Ae. albopictus strain could proliferate all year round under northern tropical conditions and could overwinter in the egg stage before proliferating in the summer in southern temperate regions.
Keyword Aedes albopictus
Australia
Population performance index
Climate
Egg mortality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
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